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Articles, News & Updates

Architecture News & Updates – Page 3

Articles, News, Promotions and Updates from Routledge and the Taylor & Francis Group.

Recent Articles

  1. Architecture 3.0

    Cliff Moser Talks with Routledge About Architecture 3.0

    In Architecture 3.0, architects are design solvers first—engaging in simulation studies, data gathering, developing strong multi-disciplined teams, and then building designers secondly (if at all).

  2. Lessons from Vernacular Architecture, A Summary

    We are pleased to present a new Earthscan from Routledge blog post written by Willi Weber and Simos Yannas, editors of Lessons from Vernacular Architecture.

    With a new entry every fortnight, blog posts written by various Earthscan from Routledge authors will be displayed both on the Routledge website and on the Earthscan from Routledge Facebook page. Each post within Facebook will be open to comments so please feel free to voice your thoughts!

  3. From Organisation to Decoration: An Interiors Reader

    Edited by Graeme Brooker and Sally Stone

    The field of interiors is a rich and diverse subject. To understand the character of the interior space is to understand the society that created it, for it is the interior, more than any other element of civilization that is lived in.

  4. Spon's Mechanical and Electrical Services Price Book 2014

    Accessing Spon’s Online

  5. NEW Architecture and Landscape Architecture Research and Reference Online Catalog

    Our Architecture and Landscape Architecture Research and Reference online catalog has just gone live.


    The catalog features our new titles, as well as our bestselling backlist collections of relevant and popular works. You will find whatever you need to further your own research or professional interests, challenge and support your students, or to provide essential reference materials for your institutional library.

    Just click on the link to browse the catalog

  6. Sir Peter Hall On How To Fix The UK’s Domestic Architecture

    The following article is by British urbanist, town planner, and geographer Peter Hall. As Bartlett Professor of Planning and Regeneration at University College London, and President of both the Town and Country Planning Association and the Regional Studies Association, Hall is internationally renowned for his studies on all aspects of cities and regions. He recently published the book Good Cities, Better Lives: How Europe Discovered the Lost Art of Urbanism.

    The entire article can be found here.

  7. Corrections and Collections: Architectures for Art and Crime

    Author Joe Day shows how institutions of discipline and exhibition have replaced malls and office towers as the anchor tenants of U.S. cities. Now that criminal and creative transgression are America’s defining civic priorities, Corrections and Collections will recalibrate your assumptions about art, architecture, and urban design. Read more...

  8. Masterplanning the Adaptive City: Computational Urbanism in the Twenty-First Century

    Divided into four parts (historical and theoretical background, our current situation, methodologies, and prototypical practices), the book includes a series of essays, interviews, built case studies, and original research to accompany chapters written by editor Tom Verebes to give you the most comprehensive overview of this approach. Read more...

  9. Architecture and Capitalism: 1845 to the Present

    Architecture and Capitalism tells a story of the relationship between the economy and architectural design. Eleven historians each discuss in brand new essays the time period they know best, looking at cultural and economic issues, which in light of current economic crises you will find have dealed with diverse but surprisingly familiar economic issues. Read more...

    To take a look inside the book, click here.

  10. Use Matters: An Alternative History of Architecture

    Use Matters is the first to assemble this alternative history, from the bathroom to the city, from ergonomics to cybernetics, and from Algeria to East Germany. It argues that the user is not a universal but a historically constructed category of twentieth-century modernity that continues to inform architectural practice and thinking in oftentimes unacknowledged ways. Read more...

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