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New Critical Idioms for Spring 2011

Travel Writing

Click here to see newly published books in the New Critical Idiom series.

Series Editor: John Drakakis, University of Stirling, UK

The well-established New Critical Idiom series continues to provide students with clear introductory guides to the most important critical terms in use today.  Each book in this popular series:

  • provides a handy, explanatory guide to the use (and abuse) of the term
  • gives an original and distinctive overview by a leading literary and cultural critic
  • relates the term to the larger field of cultural representation.

With a strong emphasis on clarity, lively debate and the widest possible breadth of examples, The New Critical Idiom series is an indispensible guide to key topics in literary studies.

A complete listing of books in the series can be found http://www.routledge.com/books/series/the_new_critical_idiom_SE0155/http://www.routledge.com/books/series/the_new_critical_idiom_SE0155/.

Related Products

  1. Dialogue

    By Peter Womack

    Series: The New Critical Idiom

    Dialogue is a many-sided critical concept; at once an ancient philosophical genre, a formal component of fiction and drama, a model for the relationship of writer and reader, and a theoretical key to the nature of language. In all its forms, it questions ‘literature’, disturbing the singleness and...

    Published April 20th 2011 by Routledge

  2. Travel Writing

    By Carl Thompson

    Series: The New Critical Idiom

    An increasingly popular genre – addressing issues of empire, colonialism, post-colonialism, globalization, gender and politics – travel writing offers the reader a movement between the familiar and the unknown. In this volume, Carl Thompson: introduces the genre, outlining competing...

    Published May 12th 2011 by Routledge

  3. Intertextuality

    2nd Edition

    By Graham Allen

    Series: The New Critical Idiom

    Theories of intertextuality suggest that meaning in a text can only ever be understood in relation to other texts; no work stands alone but is interlinked with the tradition that came before it and the context in which it is produced. This idea of intertextuality is crucial to understanding...

    Published May 18th 2011 by Routledge