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Friends and Enemies

Peer Relations and Friendships in Childhood

By Barry Schneider

Routledge – 2000 – 272 pages

Series: International Texts in Developmental Psychology

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $47.95
    978-0-340-73209-0
    June 24th 2000
  • Hardback:
    978-0-340-73208-3
    June 24th 2000
    Out-of-print

Description

Peer relations in childhood have long been thought to affect adjustment and maladjustment across the lifespan. In his timely book, Schneider, an expert in the theory and applications of research into childhood peer relationships, provides an introductory overview of this area within developmental psychology. He looks at childhood friendships, enemies and peer social interaction in the context of their effect on children in school, at home and with relation to culture and gender differences. Finally the author examines the applications of much of modern-day research through community and treatment centres designed to improve peer relationships both for groups and for the individual.

Contents

Theoretical and historical roots of peer relations research
The importance of peer relations: coping with the stresses of life
Peer relations and success at school
Measuring peer relations: what should we look for?
Techniques for assessing peer relations among children and adolescents
Relationships at the dyadic level
Peer relations of children with atypical patterns of development
Cultural and gender differences in peer relations
Facilitating children's peer relations in schools, communities and treatment centres.

Related Subjects

  1. General Psychology

Name: Friends and Enemies: Peer Relations and Friendships in Childhood (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: By Barry Schneider. Peer relations in childhood have long been thought to affect adjustment and maladjustment across the lifespan. In his timely book, Schneider, an expert in the theory and applications of research into childhood peer relationships, provides an introductory...
Categories: General Psychology