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The Internet

A Philosophical Inquiry

By Gordon Graham

Routledge – 2002 – 192 pages

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $43.95
    978-0-415-19749-6
    September 1st 1999
  • Add to CartHardback: $110.00
    978-0-415-19748-9
    September 1st 1999

Description

The Internet: A Philosophical Inquiry develops many of the themes Gordon Graham presented in his highly successful radio series, The Silicon Society. Exploring the tensions between the warnings of the Neo-Luddites and the bright optimism of the Technophiles, Graham offers the first concise and accessible exploration of the issues which arise as we enter further into the world of Cyberspace.

This original and fascinating study takes us to the heart of questions that none of us can afford to ignore: how does the Internet affect our concepts of identity, moral anarchy, censorship, community, democracy, virtual reality and imagination?

Free of jargon and full of stimulating ideas, this is essential reading for anyone wishing to think clearly and informatively about the complexities of our technological future.

Reviews

'a lucid and wide-ranging philosophical study' - Jonathan Ree, The Independent on Sunday

'an accessible and thought provoking philosophical tract, one that suggests new ways of looking at the internet.' - The Philosopher's Magazine

'Graham's book is clear, non-technical and pithily argued…it is a book well worth reading' - The Philosophical Quarterly

'The virtues of this book are many… Graham has surely succeeded in making himself intelligible to the broader audience in this wonderful book.' - Philosophical Books

Name: The Internet: A Philosophical Inquiry (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: By Gordon Graham. The Internet: A Philosophical Inquiry develops many of the themes Gordon Graham presented in his highly successful radio series, The Silicon Society. Exploring the tensions between the warnings of the Neo-Luddites and the bright optimism of the...
Categories: Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Technology