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An Archaeology of Natural Places

By Richard Bradley

Routledge – 2000 – 192 pages

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  • Add to CartPaperback: $42.95
    978-0-415-22150-4
    February 10th 2000
  • Add to CartHardback: $135.00
    978-0-415-22149-8
    February 10th 2000
    Currently out of stock

Description

This volume explores why natural places such as caves, mountains, springs and rivers assumed a sacred character in European prehistory, and how the evidence for this can be analysed in the field. It shows how established research on votive deposits, rock art and production sites can contribute to a more imaginative approach to the prehistoric landscape, and can even shed light on the origins of monumental architecture. The discussion is illustrated through a wide range of European examples, and three extended case studies.

An Archaeology of Natural Places extends the range of landscape studies and makes the results of modern research accessible to a wider audience, including students and academics, field archaeologists, and those working in heritage management.

Reviews

'It will be very useful for teaching purposes. This is a lively provocative text and Bradley is to be thanked for opening up an important area for archaeologists to debate.' - Archaeology North

'This is a long-overdue work, and it is not surprising that such a perceptive archaeologist as Bradley has taken it on.' - Northern Earth

This is an immensely readable and thought-provoking book. As ever, Bradley weaves his argument with deftness … His perceptive identification of new questions is always refreshing but most of all his discussion of these involves and challenges the reader in a way that few writers achieve so effectively - Journal of the Royal Archaeological Institute

Name: An Archaeology of Natural Places (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: By Richard Bradley. This volume explores why natural places such as caves, mountains, springs and rivers assumed a sacred character in European prehistory, and how the evidence for this can be analysed in the field. It shows how established research on votive deposits, rock...
Categories: British Archaeology, European Archaeology