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Hacktivism and Cyberwars

Rebels with a Cause?

By Tim Jordan, Paul Taylor

Routledge – 2004 – 192 pages

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $61.95
    978-0-415-26004-6
    May 28th 2004
  • Add to CartHardback: $195.00
    978-0-415-26003-9
    June 23rd 2004

Description

As global society becomes more and more dependent, politically and economically, on the flow of information, the power of those who can disrupt and manipulate that flow also increases. In Hacktivism and Cyberwars Tim Jordan and Paul Taylor provide a detailed history of hacktivism's evolution from early hacking culture to its present day status as the radical face of online politics. They describe the ways in which hacktivism has re-appropriated hacking techniques to create an innovative new form of political protest. A full explanation is given of the different strands of hacktivism and the 'cyberwars' it has created, ranging from such avant garde groups as the Electronic Disturbance Theatre to more virtually focused groups labelled 'The Digitally Correct'. The full social and historical context of hacktivism is portrayed to take into account its position in terms of new social movements, direct action and its contribution to the globalization debate.

This book provides an important corrective flip-side to mainstream accounts of E-commerce and broadens the conceptualization of the internet to take into full account the other side of the digital divide.

Contents

1. Hacking and Hacktivism 2. Viral Times: Vulnerability, Uncertainty and Ethical Ambiguity in the Information Age 3. Hacktivism and the History of Protest 4. Mass Action Hacktivism: Anti-Globalization and the Importance of Bad Technology 5. Digitally-Correct Hacktivism: The Purity of Informational Politics 6. Men in the Matrix: Informational Intimacy 7. The Dot.Communist Manifesto 8. Hacktivism: Informational Politics for Informational Times

Name: Hacktivism and Cyberwars: Rebels with a Cause? (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: By Tim Jordan, Paul Taylor. As global society becomes more and more dependent, politically and economically, on the flow of information, the power of those who can disrupt and manipulate that flow also increases. In Hacktivism and Cyberwars Tim Jordan and Paul Taylor provide a...
Categories: New Media, Sociology & Social Policy, Sociology of Culture