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Virtual Theatres

An Introduction

By Gabriella Giannachi

Routledge – 2004 – 184 pages

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $47.95
    978-0-415-28379-3
    March 11th 2004
  • Add to CartHardback: $130.00
    978-0-415-28378-6
    March 11th 2004

Description

The first full-length book of its kind to offer an investigation of the interface between theatre, performance and digital arts, Virtual Theatres presents the theatre of the twenty-first century in which everything - even the viewer - can be simulated.

In this fascinating volume, Gabriella Giannachi analyzes the aesthetic concerns of current computer-arts practices through discussion of a variety of artists and performers including:

* blast Theory

* Merce Cunningham

* Eduardo Kac

* forced entertainment

* Lynn Hershman

* Jodi Orlan

* Guillermo Gómez-Peña

* Marcel-lí Antúnez Roca

* Jeffrey Shaw

* Stelarc.

Virtual Theatres not only allows for a reinterpretation of what is possible in the world of performance practice, but also demonstrates how 'virtuality' has come to represent a major parameter for our understanding and experience of contemporary art and life.

Reviews

'A welcome addition to the growing range of works currently available on virtual reality and performance. It is clearly written and offers a useful historical overview of the field to date … Giannachi has done impressive work in collating a vast and stimulating array of relevant examples … There is no question that Virtual Theatres is a tremendously useful teaching and research resource. It will be of great use to teachers of new media, as well as post-graduate and under-graduate students of theatre studies.' – Studies in Theatre Performance

Name: Virtual Theatres: An Introduction (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: By Gabriella Giannachi. The first full-length book of its kind to offer an investigation of the interface between theatre, performance and digital arts, Virtual Theatres presents the theatre of the twenty-first century in which everything - even the viewer - can be...
Categories: Performance Theory, Cyberculture, New Media