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Geographies of Labour Market Inequality

Edited by Ron Martin, Philip S. Morrison

Routledge – 2002 – 280 pages

Series: Regions and Cities

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  • Add to CartPaperback: $73.95
    978-0-415-30014-8
    October 31st 2002
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    978-0-415-30013-1
    October 31st 2002

Description

In recent years, the local dimensions of the labour market have attracted increasing attention from academic analysts and public policy-makers alike. There is growing realization that there is no such thing as the national labour market, instead a mosaic of local and regional markets that differ in nature, performance and regulation. Geographies of Labour Market Inequality is concerned with these multiple geographies of employment, unemployment, work and incomes, and their implications for public policy.

Contents

I: Introduction 1. Thinking about the Geographies of Labour II: The Production of Local Labour Markets Inequalities 2. Labour Market Risk and the Regions: Evidence form Gross Labour 3. Unemployment and Spatial Labour Markets: Strong Adjustments and Persistent Concentration 4. The Distribution of Incomes and Social Segregation: The Interactive Role of Housing and Labour Market Sorting Processes 5. Conceptualising Local Labour Markets 6. New Economy, Labour Market Inequalities and the Work Life Balance Issue III: Interventions and Policies 7. The Union Role in Preserving Jobs and Communities: The Employee Ownership Option 8. The Local Impact of the New Deal: Does Geography Make a Difference? 9. The Geographies of the National Minimum Wage IV: Postscript 10. The Geographies of Labour Market Inequality: Some Emergent Issues and Challenges

Related Subjects

  1. Historical Geography

Name: Geographies of Labour Market Inequality (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by Ron Martin, Philip S. Morrison. In recent years, the local dimensions of the labour market have attracted increasing attention from academic analysts and public policy-makers alike. There is growing realization that there is no such thing as the national labour market, instead a mosaic...
Categories: Historical Geography