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Tiny Revolutions in Russia

Twentieth Century Soviet and Russian History in Anecdotes and Jokes

By Bruce Adams

Routledge – 2005 – 184 pages

Series: Routledge Studies in the History of Russia and Eastern Europe

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $54.95
    978-0-415-44407-1
    May 13th 2007
  • Add to CartHardback: $158.00
    978-0-415-35173-7
    January 10th 2005

Description

This book presents a large collection of anecdotes and jokes from different periods of the 20th century. Anecdotes and jokes were a hidden form of discursive communication in the Soviet era, lampooning official practices and acting as a confidential form of self-affirmation. They were not necessarily anti-Soviet, by their very nature both criticising existing reality and acting as a form of acquiescence. Above all they provide invaluable insights into everyday life, and the attitudes and concerns of ordinary people. The book also includes anecdotes and jokes from the post-Soviet period, when ordinary people in Russia continued to have to cope with rather grim reality, and the compiler provides extensive introductory and explanatory matter to set the material in context.

Reviews

'An invaluable resource in teaching and understanding life under Communism.' - Contemporary Review, 287

Contents

Introduction 1. Lenin 2. Stalin 3. Khrushchev 4. Brezhnev 5. Andropov and Chernenko 6. Gorbachev, Yeltsin, and Putin Index

Author Bio

Bruce Adams is professor of Russian history at the University of Louisville. His previous book was The Politics of Punishment: Prison Reform in Russia, 1863-1917. His current research concerns the re-emigration of Russian and Soviet citizens from China to the Soviet Union between the 1920s and the 1960s.

Name: Tiny Revolutions in Russia: Twentieth Century Soviet and Russian History in Anecdotes and Jokes (Hardback)Routledge 
Description: By Bruce Adams. This book presents a large collection of anecdotes and jokes from different periods of the 20th century. Anecdotes and jokes were a hidden form of discursive communication in the Soviet era, lampooning official practices and acting as a confidential form...
Categories: European History, Russian & Soviet Politics, Sociology of Culture