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The History of Higher Education

Edited by Roy Lowe

Routledge – 2008 – 2,212 pages

Series: Major Themes in Education

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    978-0-415-37854-3
    September 24th 2008

Description

This new Major Work is a five-volume collection in Routledge’s Major Themes in Education series. It charts the history and development of higher education. Encompassing the period since 1760, the principal focus is on the late-eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, although more recent developments are also addressed.

The rise and development of universities and of higher education in Britain provides the central theme of the collection and is used as a model for developments elsewhere in the English-speaking world. Particular attention is paid to the United States and the British Empire, but some material on other European countries and on the rise of higher education in countries such as Japan and China has also been included. Thus, at the core of this collection is the dissemination of a university ideal around the globe and its particular implications and interpretation in specific societies and locations.

Contents

Volume I

1. Mehdi Nakosteen, History of Islamic Origins of Western Education, 800–1350 (University of Colorado Press, 1964), pp. 1–4, 13–26, 50–61.

2. J. F. Ade Ajayi, Lameck K. H. Goma, and G. Ampah Johnson, The African Experience with Higher Education (The Association of African Universities in association with James Curry and Ohio University Press, 1996), pp. 1–25, 262–72.

3. Gabriel Compayré, Abelard and the Origin and Early History of Universities (AMS Press, 1969) (reprinted from the 1893 edition), pp. 46–69.

4. A. B. Cobban, The Medieval Universities: Their Development and Organisation (Methuen, 1975), pp. 116–21.

5. Paul F. Grendler, The Universities of the Italian Renaissance (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002), pp. 3–21.

6. V. H. H. Green, The Universities (Penguin Books, 1969), pp. 13–20.

7. Abraham Flexner, Universities: American, English, German (Oxford University Press, 1930), pp. 311–27.

8. Jennings L. Wagoner, Jr., Jefferson and Education (Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Monticello Monograph Series, 2004), pp. 127–45, 159–62.

9. W. Bruce Leslie, Gentlemen and Scholars: College and Community in the ‘Age of the University’, 1865–1917 (The Pennsylvania State University Press, 1992), pp. 11–28.

10. Ralph E. Lombardi, ‘Universities in the USA: Secondary School Characteristics’, Universities Quarterly, IX, 1954–5, pp. 66–72.

11. Andrew Lockhart Walker, The Revival of the Democratic Intellect: Scotland’s University Traditions and the Crisis in Modern Thought (Polygon Press, 1994), pp. 22–37, 321–3.

12. John D. Hargreaves, Academe and Empire: Some Overseas Connections of Aberdeen University, 1860–1970 (Aberdeen University Press, 1994), pp. 5–32, 114–17.

13. R. D. Anderson, Universities and Elites in Britain Since 1800 (Macmillan Press for the Economic History Society, 1992), pp. 12–28.

14. Asa Briggs, ‘The Development of Higher Education in the United Kingdom: The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries’, in W. R. Niblett (ed.), Higher Education: Demand and Response (Tavistock Publications, 1969), pp. 95–116.

15. Gary B. Cohen, Education and Middle-Class Society in Imperial Austria, 1848–1918 (Purdue University Press, 1996), pp. 75–94, 514–17.

16. Brian Simon, ‘Higher Education in Poland’, Universities Quarterly, VII, 1952–3, pp. 176–83.

17. J. W. Blake, ‘European Rectors and Vice-Chancellors in Conference’, Universities Quarterly, X, 1955–6, pp. 15–18.

18. Walter Adams, ‘Higher Education in the British Colonies’, Universities Quarterly, I, 1946–7, pp. 145–53.

19. Donald Fisher and Kjell Rubenson, ‘The Changing Political Economy: The Private and Public Lives of Canadian Universities’, in Jan Currie and Janice Newton (eds.), Universities and Globalisation: Critical Perspectives (Sage Publications, 1998), pp. 77–98.

20. J. D. G. Medley, ‘The Universities of Australia’, Universities Quarterly, 2, 2, Feb. 1948, pp. 151–8.

21. Asavia Wandira, The African University in Development (Ravan Press, 1977), pp. 8–36.

22. R. S. Dongerkery, ‘University Education in Free India’, Universities Quarterly, V, 1950–1, pp. 72–9.

23. Rahim I. Qubain, Education and Science in the Arab World (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1966), pp. 48–60.

24. Orlando Albornoz, ‘Models of the Latin American University’, in Joseph Maier and Richard W. Weatherhead (eds.), The Latin American University (University of New Mexico Press, 1979), pp. 123–34.

25. Philip G. Altbach, ‘The Past and Future of Asian Universities: Twenty-First Century Challenges’, in Philip G. Altbach and Toru Umakoshi (eds.), Asian Universities: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary Challenges (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004), pp. 13–32.

26. Weifang Min, ‘Chinese Higher Education: The Legacy of the Past and the Context of the Future’, in Philip G. Altbach and Toru Umakoshi (eds.), Asian Universities: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary Challenges (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004), pp. 53–83.

27. Motohisa Kaneko, ‘Japanese Higher Education: Contemporary Reform and the Influence of Tradition’, in Philip G. Altbach and Toru Umakoshi (eds.), Asian Universities: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary Challenges (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004), pp. 115–43.

28. Philip G. Altbach et al. (eds.), Scientific Development and Higher Education: The Case of Newly Industrialising Nations (Praeger Publishers, 1989), pp. 3–29.

Volume II

29. A. B. Cobban, The Mediaeval Universities: Their Development and Organisation (Methuen, 1975), pp. 21–36.

30. Hastings Rashdall, The Universities of Europe in the Middle Ages, eds. F. M. Powicke and A. B. Emden (Oxford University Press, 1936; orig. pub. 1893), pp. 2–24.

31. John Henry Cardinal Newman, The Idea of a University Defined and Illustrated (Longmans, Green and Co., 1910), pp. 99–123.

32. Sheldon Rothblatt, ‘Loss and Gain: John Henry Newman in 2005’, in Ann Lavan (ed.), The University and Society: From Newman to the Market (University College Dublin, 2006), pp. 15–29.

33. Cyril Bibby (ed.), The Essence of T. H. Huxley (Macmillan, 1967), pp. 220–30.

34. Cyril Bibby, ‘T. H. Huxley’s Idea of a University’, Universities Quarterly, X, 1955–6, pp. 377–90.

35. A. Flexner, ‘The Idea of a Modern University’, Universities: American, English and German (Oxford University Press, 1930), pp. 3–36.

36. A. Mansbridge, The Older Universities of England: Oxford and Cambridge (Longmans, Green and Co., 1923), pp. 172–95.

37. R. H. Tawney, ‘An Experiment in Democratic Education’, The Political Quarterly, May 1914, pp. 62–84.

38. Bruce Truscot, ‘The Nature and Aims of a Modern University’, Red Brick University (Faber and Faber, 1943), pp. 45–56.

39. Walter Moberley, ‘Changing Conceptions of the University’s Task’, The Crisis in the University (SCM Press, Ltd., 1949), pp. 30–49.

40. H. C. Dent, The Universities in Transition (Cohen and West, 1961), pp. 15–28.

41. Sheldon Rothblatt, ‘The Idea of a University and its Antithesis’, The Modern University and its Discontents (Cambridge University Press), 1997, pp. 1–49.

42. A. H. Halsey and M. A. Trow, ‘The Changing Functions of Universities’, The British Academics (Faber and Faber, 1971), pp. 31–7.

43. Lord Robbins, The University in the Modern World (London, 1966), pp. 1–16.

44. Eric Ashby, ‘The Idea of a University’, Adapting Universities to a Technological Society (Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1974), pp. 1–15.

45. Eric Ashby, ‘Mass Higher Education’, Adapting Universities to a Technological Society (Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1974), pp. 134–44.

46. Sheldon Rothblatt, ‘Federal Universities and Multi-Campus Systems: Britain and the United States Since the Nineteenth Century’, in J. J. Carter and D. J. Withrington (eds.), Scottish Universities: Distinctiveness and Diversity (John Donald Publishers, 1992), pp. 164–87.

47. Clark Kerr, ‘The Pluralistic University in the Pluralistic Society’, The Great Transformation in Higher Education, 1960–1980 (State University of New York Press, 1991), pp. 47–67.

48. Clark Kerr, ‘The Idea of a Multiversity’, The Uses of the University (Harvard University Press, 1995), pp. 1–34.

49. A. H. Halsey, Decline of Donnish Dominion: The British Academic Profession in the Twentieth Century (Clarendon Press, 1995), pp. 23–57, 369–75.

50. Harold Silver, Higher Education and Opinion Making in Twentieth-Century England (Frank Cass, 2002), pp. 252–65.

Volume III

51. Konrad H. Jarausch, ‘Higher Education and Social Change: Some Comparative Perspectives’, in Jarausch (ed.), The Transformation of Higher Learning, 1860–1930 (Klett-Cotta, 1981), pp. 9–36.

52. Guy Neave, ‘The University and the State in Western Europe’, in D. Jaques and J. T. E. Richardson (eds.), The Future for Higher Education (proceedings of the 19th annual conference of the Society for Research into Higher Education, 1983) (SRHE and NFER-Nelson, 1985), pp. 27–40.

53. Michael Sanderson, ‘The Universities and British Industry, 1850–1970: Conclusion’, The Universities and British Industry, 1850–1970 (Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1972), pp. 389–97.

54. W. H. G. Armytage, ‘Community Service Stations: The Transformation of the Civic Universities, 1898–1930’, Civic Universities (Arno Press, 1977), pp. 243–64.

55. Lord Curzon of Kedleston, ‘The Admission of Poor Men’, Principles and Methods of University Reform (Clarendon Press, 1909), pp. 42–75.

56. Roy Pascal, ‘The Universities and Social Purpose’, Universities Quarterly, IV, 1949–50, pp. 37–43.

57. Sydney Caine, ‘Reflections on Policy’, British Universities: Purposes and Prospects (The Bodley Head, 1969), pp. 246–66.

58. Robert O. Berdahl, British Universities and the State (Cambridge University Press, 1959), pp. 183–94.

59. ‘Grants to Students in Scotland’ (report of the Committee appointed by the Minister of Education and the Secretary of State for Scotland in June 1958) (HMSO, 1958), pp. 1–8, 77–87.

60. ‘Higher Education: Aims and Principles’ (report of the Robbins Committee on Higher Education) (HMSO, 1963), pp. 4–10, 364–7.

61. John Carswell, ‘Some Conclusions’, Government and the Universities in Britain: Programme and Performance, 1960–1980 (Cambridge University Press, 1985), pp. 159–68.

62. Harold Silver, ‘Past and Futures’, A Higher Education: The Council for National Academic Awards and British Higher Education, 1964–89 (Falmer Press, 1990), pp. 260–72.

63. E. P. Thompson, ‘The Business University’, in Thompson (ed.), Warwick University Ltd (Penguin Books, 1970), pp. 13–41.

64. H. S. Ferns, Towards an Independent University (The Institute of Economic Affairs, 1970), pp. 9–26.

65. Vincent Carpentier, ‘Funding in Higher Education and Economic Growth in France and the United Kingdom, 1921–2003’, Higher Education Management and Policy, 18, 3, 2006, pp. 1–22.

66. Charles E. Mclelland, ‘Professionalization and Higher Education in Germany (1860–1930)’, in K. H. Jarausch (ed.), The Transformation of Higher Learning, 1860–1930 (Klett-Cotta, 1981), pp. 306–20.

67. Notker Hammerstein, ‘National Socialism and the German Universities’, History of Universities, XVIII, I, 2003, pp. 170–88.

68. Lord Lindsay of Birker, ‘The Commission on German Universities’, Universities Quarterly, 1949–50, pp. 82–8.

69. James T. Flynn, The University Reform of Tsar Alexander I, 1802–1835 (The Catholic University of America Press, 1988), pp. 1–25.

70. Alexander Kinghorn, ‘The American State University Today’, Universities Quarterly, X, 1955–6, pp. 69–79.

71. Sheldon Rothblatt, ‘Affirmative Action’, Education’s Abiding Moral Dilemma: Merit and Worth in the Cross-Atlantic Democracies, 1800–2006 (Oxford University Press, 2007), pp. 277–300.

72. John E. Fleming, ‘Blacks in Higher Education to 1954: A Historical Overview’, in Gail E. Thomas (ed.), Black Students in Higher Education: Conditions and Experiences in the 1970s (Greenwood Press, 1981), pp. 11–17.

73. John Rex, ‘Apartheid in the South African Universities’, Universities Quarterly, VIII, 1953–4, 333–40.

Volume IV

74. William Whewell, ‘Of the Subjects of University Teaching’, On the Principles of English University Education (John W. Parker, 1838), pp. 5–51.

75. John Henry Newman, ‘Christianity and Scientific Investigation: A Lecture’, On the Scope and Nature of University Education (J. M. Dent, 1915), pp. 235–59.

76. R. W. Livingstone, ‘The Need for the Study of Philosophy’, Education and the Spirit of the Age (Clarendon Press, 1952), pp. 22–39.

77. Karl Jaspers, ‘The Cosmos of Knowledge’, The Idea of the University (Peter Owen, 1960), pp. 93–110.

78. Jose Ortega y Gasset, ‘Culture and Science’, Mission of the University (Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner and Co., Ltd., 1946), pp. 63–72.

79. Adolf Löwe, ‘Outlines of a Possible Solution’, The Universities in Transformation (The Sheldon Press, 1940), pp. 21–47.

80. John M. Fletcher, ‘The College-University: Its Development in Aberdeen and Beyond’, in J. J. Carter and D. J. Withrington (eds.), Scottish Universities: Distinctiveness and Diversity (John Donald Publishers, 1992), pp. 16–25.

81. John M. Fletcher, ‘Change and Resistance to Change: A Consideration of the Development of English and German Universities During the Sixteenth Century’, in History of Universities, vol. I, (Avebury Press, 1981), pp. 1–36.

82. Charles Webster, ‘Science and Medicine in Academic Studies Before 1640’, The Great Instauration: Science, Medicine and Reform, 1626–1660 (Holmes and Meier, 1975), pp. 115–22.

83. John Twigg, ‘The Limits of "Reform": Some Aspects of the Debate on University Education During the English Revolution’, in History of Universities, vol. 4 (Oxford University Press, 1984), pp. 99–114.

84. Christopher Stray, ‘From Oral to Written Examinations: Cambridge, Oxford and Dublin 1700–1914’, in History of Universities, vol. XX/2 (Oxford University Press, 2005), pp. 76–130.

85. Christopher Stray, ‘Curriculum and Style in the Collegiate University: Classics in Nineteenth-Century Oxbridge’, in History of Universities, vol. XVI/2 (Oxford University Press, 2000), pp. 183–218.

86. G. L. E. Turner, ‘Experimental Science in Early Nineteenth-Century Oxford’, in History of Universities, vol. VIII (Oxford University Press, 1989), pp. 117–35.

87. Roy Lowe, ‘Structural Change in English Higher Education, 1870–1920’, in Detlef K. Müller, Fritz Ringer, and Brian Simon (eds.), The Rise of the Modern Educational System, 1870–1920 (Cambridge University Press, 1987), pp. 163–78.

88. T. D. Weldon, ‘Modern Greats’, Universities Quarterly, I, 1946–7, 348–57.

89. J. S. Fulton, ‘General Education’, Universities Quarterly, V, 1950–1, 41–8.

90. E. E. Robinson, ‘Higher Education Since the War: Universities, CATs and Technical Colleges: Robbins and After’, The New Polytechnics (Cornmarket, 1968), pp. 13–33.

91. Peter Venables, ‘From Technical School to Technological University’, Higher Education Developments: The Technological Universities (Faber and Faber, 1978), pp. 11–34.

92. Walter Perry, ‘The Basic Ideas’, Open University: A Personal Account by the first Vice-Chancellor (Open University Press, 1976), pp. 1–10.

93. Oliver Fulton, ‘Modular Systems in Britain’, in R. O. Berdhal, G. C. Moodie, and I. J. Spitzberg (eds.), Quality and Access in Higher Education (SRHE and Open University Press, 1991), pp. 142–51.

94. Stephen C. Ferruolo, ‘The Paris Statutes of 1215 Reconsidered’, in History of Universities, vol. V (Oxford University Press, 1985), pp. 1–14.

95. Jurgen Herbst, ‘American Higher Education in the Age of the College’, in History of Universities, vol. VII (Oxford University Press, 1988), pp. 37–59.

96. John U. Nef, ‘The Committee on Social Thought of the University of Chicago’, Universities Quarterly, III, 1948–9, 678–86.

97. Sheldon Rothblatt, ‘The American Modular System’, in R. O. Berdahl, G. C. Moodie, and I. J. Spitzberg (eds.), Quality and Access in Higher Education: Comparing Britain and the United States (SRHE and Open University Press, 1991), pp. 129–41.

Volume V

98. Martin Trow, ‘Elite and Popular Functions in American Higher Education’, in W. R. Niblett (ed.), Higher Education: Demand and Response (Tavistock Publications, 1969), pp. 181–201.

99. Allan Bloom, ‘The Student and the University’, The Closing of the American Mind (Simon and Schuster, 1987), pp. 336–81.

100. Harold Perkin, ‘The Pattern of Social Transformation in England’, in K. H. Jarausch (ed.), The Transformation of Higher Learning, 1860–1930 (Klett-Cotta, 1981), pp. 207–18.

101. A. H. Halsey and M. A. Trow, ‘The Evolution of the British Universities’, The British Academics (Faber and Faber, 1971), pp. 38–64.

102. Martin Wiener, ‘The Shaping of a Gentleman’, English Culture and the Decline of the Industrial Spirit, 1850–1980 (Penguin, 1985), pp. 16–24, 174–7.

103. R. D. Anderson, ‘Universities and Elites in Modern Britain’, in History of Universities, vol. X (Oxford University Press, 1991), pp. 226–50.

104. R. D. Anderson, ‘Origins and Destinations’, Universities and Elites in Britain Since 1800 (Macmillan, 1992), pp. 47–78.

105. Elizabeth J. Morse, ‘English Civic Universities and the Myth of Decline’, in History of Universities, vol. XI (Oxford University Press, 1992), pp. 177–204.

106. Roy Lowe, ‘English Elite Education in the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries’, in W. Conze and J. Kocka (eds.), Bildungsbürgertum im 19, Jahrhundert, Teil I (Klett-Cotta, 1985), pp. 147–62.

107. Roy Lowe, ‘The Expansion of Higher Education in England’, in K. H. Jarausch (ed.), The Transformation of Higher Learning, 1860–1930 (Klett-Cotta, 1981), pp. 37–56.

108. Sheldon Rothblatt, ‘The Diversification of Higher Education in England’, in K. H. Jarausch (ed.), The Transformation of Higher Learning, 1860–1930 (Klett-Cotta, 1981), pp. 131–48.

109. Fritz Ringer, ‘Education and the Middle Classes in Modern France’, in W. Conze and J. Kocka (eds.), Bildungsbürgertum im 19, Jahrhundert, Teil I (Klett-Cotta, 1985), pp. 109–46.

110. Brian Simon, ‘The Students and the Future’, A Student’s View of the Universities (Longmans Green and Co., 1943), pp. 120–42.

111. Eric Ashby, ‘The Student Movement’, Masters and Scholars (Oxford University Press, 1970), pp. 25–49.

112. Antonio Garcia y Garcia, ‘The Medieval Students of the University of Salamanca’, in History of Universities, vol. X, (Oxford University Press, 1991), pp. 93–105.

113. Robert L. Church, ‘Economists as Experts: The Rise of an Academic Profession in the United States, 1870–1920’, in L. Stone (ed.), The University in Society, vol. II (‘Europe, Scotland and the United States from the Sixteenth to the Nineteenth Century’) (Princeton University Press, 1975), pp. 571–609.

114. Sheldon Rothblatt, ‘Donnishness’, The Revolution of the Dons: Cambridge and Society in Victorian England (Cambridge University Press, 1968), pp. 181–208.

115. Sheldon Rothblatt, ‘The Academic Role’, Tradition and Change in English Liberal Education (Faber and Faber, 1976), pp. 174–94.

116. Arthur Engel, ‘Emerging Concepts of the Academic Profession at Oxford, 1800–1854’, in L. Stone (ed.), The University in Society, vol. I (‘Oxford and Cambridge from the 14th to the early 19th Century’) (Princeton University Press, 1974), pp. 305–51.

117. A. H. Halsey, ‘Women and Men’, Decline of Donnish Dominion: The British Academic Professions in the Twentieth Century (Clarendon Press, 1995), pp. 216–34.

118. Carol Dyhouse, ‘Patterns of Provision: Access and Accommodation’, No Distinction of Sex? Women in British Universities, 1870–1939 (UCL Press, 1995), pp. 11–55.

119. Linda Eisenmann, ‘Reconsidering a Classic: Assessing the History of Women’s Higher Education a Dozen Years after Barbara Solomon’, Harvard Educational Review, 67, 4, Winter 1997, 689–717.

Name: The History of Higher Education (Hardback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by Roy Lowe. This new Major Work is a five-volume collection in Routledge’s Major Themes in Education series. It charts the history and development of higher education. Encompassing the period since 1760, the principal focus is on the late-eighteenth and...
Categories: History of Education, Philosophy of Education, Social & Cultural History