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The Language of Advertising: Major Themes in English Studies

Edited by Guy Cook

Routledge – 2007 – 1,656 pages

Series: Major Themes in English Studies

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    978-0-415-41215-5
    October 29th 2007

Description

Advertising is one of the most prominent, powerful, and ubiquitous contemporary uses of language. Its seductive and controversial quality has attracted consistent and intense attention across a range of academic disciplines including linguistics, media studies, politics, semiotics, and sociology.

The reasons for this academic interest are far from superficial. The study of advertising brings together many of the key social and political issues of our time: the new capitalism; globalization; overconsumption and the environment; cultural and individual identities; and the communications revolution. It provides insight into the ideologies and values of contemporary societies.

Advertising’s creative use of language makes it a particularly rich site for language and discourse analysis. Operating in all media and exploiting the interaction between word, sound, and image, it provides a key location for studies of multimodal communication. Simultaneously poetic and commercial, it raises questions about the nature of creativity and art.

Ever since the intensification of advertising in the 1950s, leading scholars have analysed its use of language. This new four-volume Routledge Major Work brings together for the first time the most seminal and controversial works, allowing users to obtain a wide and inclusive view of this rewarding topic. It will be welcomed by scholars and other researchers in the field as an invaluable ‘mini library’ on the language of advertising.

Contents

VOLUME ONE: Fundamentals

Part 1: Early Critiques

1. Vance Packard, ‘The Depth Approach’, The Hidden Persuaders (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1956), pp. 2–10.

2. Vance Packard, ‘The Trouble with People’, The Hidden Persuaders (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1956), pp. 13–23.

3. Roland Barthes, ‘Soap Powders and Detergents’, Mythologies, trans. A. Lavers (London: Paladin, 1972), pp. 36–9.

4. Roland Barthes, ‘Operation Margarine’, Mythologies, trans. A. Lavers (London: Paladin, 1972), pp. 41–3.

5. Roland Barthes, ‘The New Citroën’, Mythologies, trans. A. Lavers (London: Paladin, 1972), pp. 88–91.

6. Raymond Williams, ‘Advertising: The Magic System’, Problems in Materialism and Culture (London: Verso, 1980), pp. 170-195

7. Marshall McLuhan, ‘Keeping Upset With the Joneses’, Understanding Media (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1964), pp. 241–9.

8. Judith Williamson, ‘A Currency of Signs’, Decoding Advertisements (London: Marion Boyars, 1978), pp. 20–39.

9. Erving Goffman, ‘Gender Display’, Gender Advertisements (London: Macmillan, 1979), pp. 1–9.

10. Erving Goffman, ‘Gender Commercials’, Gender Advertisements (London: Macmillan, 1979), pp. 24–7.

Part 2: Background Theory

11. Ferdinand de Saussure, ‘General Principles’, Course In General Linguistics, trans. Wade Baskin (London: Fontana/Collins, 1960), pp. 65–78.

12. Floyd Merrell, ‘Charles Sanders Peirce’s Concept of the Sign’, in Paul Cobley (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Semiotics and Linguistics (London: Routledge, 2001), pp. 28–39.

13. Roman Jakobson, ‘Closing Statement: Linguistics and Poetics’, in T. A. Sebeok (ed.), Style in Language (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1960), pp. 350–60.

14. G. N. Leech, ‘Language and Motive’, English in Advertising (London: Longman, 1966), pp. 25–31.

15. G. N. Leech, ‘The Advertising Situation’, English in Advertising (London: Longman, 1966), pp. 32–8.

16. H. G. Widdowson, ‘Procedures for Discourse Processing’, Explorations in Applied Linguistics Two (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984), pp. 100–21.

17. Norman Fairclough, ‘Advertising and Consumerism’, Language and Power (London: Longman, 1989), pp. 199–211.

18. Guy Cook, ‘Language Play in Advertisements: Some Implications for Applied Linguistics’, in D. Graddol and J. Swann (eds.), Evaluating Language. BAAL Studies in Applied Linguistics 9 (British Association for Applied Linguistics in Association with Multilingual Matters, 1994), pp. 102–16.

19. Guy Cook, ‘The Genre of the Advertisement’, The Discourse of Advertising (London: Routledge, 2001), pp. 1–17.

Part 3: Advertising Language

20. G. N. Leech, ‘Words and Compounds’, English in Advertising (London: Longman, 1966), pp. 135–41.

21. G. N. Leech, ‘Cohesion and Lack of Cohesion’, English in Advertising (London: Longman, 1966), pp. 142–50.

22. Michael L. Geis, ‘The Strength of a Claim’, The Language of Television Advertising (New York: Academic, 1982), pp. 59–83.

23. Gillian Dyer, ‘The Language of Advertising’, Advertising as Communication (London: Routledge, 1992), pp. 139–57.

24. Torben Vestergaard and Kim Schrøder, ‘Language and Communication’, The Language of Advertising (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1985), pp. 50–69.

25. Guy Cook, ‘Words and Phrases’, The Discourse of Advertising (London: Routledge, 2001), pp. 101–21.

26. Greg Myers, ‘"You in the Shocking Pink Shell-Suit": Pronouns and Address’, Words in Ads (London: Arnold, 1997), pp. 47–55.

27. Paul Simpson, ‘"Reason" and "Tickle" as Pragmatic Constructs in the Discourse of Advertising’, Journal of Pragmatics, 33, 4, 2001, pp. 589–607.

28. E. F. McQuarrie and D. G. Mick, ‘Figures of Rhetoric in Advertising Language’, Journal of Consumer Research, 22, 1996, pp. 424–38.

29. D. Crystal, Language Play (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1998), pp. 93–100.

30. R. A. Carter, ‘Introduction’, Language and Creativity (London: Routledge, 2004), pp. 1–10.

VOLUME TWO: The Social Context of Advertising Language

Part 4: Advertising in Society

31. W. Leiss, S. Kline, S. Jhally, and J. Botterill, ‘Late Modern Consumer Society’, Social Communication in Advertising (London: Routledge, 2000), pp. 295–332.

32. R. Goldman, ‘Legitimation Ads: The Story of the Family and How it Saved Capitalism from Itself’, Reading Ads Socially (London: Routledge, 1994), pp. 85–106.

33. Don Slater, ‘Consumer Culture and the Politics of Need’, in M. Nava, A. Blake, I. MacRury, and B. Richards (eds.), Buy This Book: Studies in Advertising and Consumption (London: Routledge, 1997), pp. 51–64.

34. Andrew Goatly, ‘Advertising and Consumerism’, Critical Reading and Writing (London: Routledge, 2000), pp. 183–211.

35. J. Thompson, ‘Advertising’s Rationality’, in M. Alvarado and J. Thompson (eds.), The Media Reader (London: British Film Institute, 1990), pp. 208–12.

Part 5: Advertising Across Cultures

36. Helen Kelly-Holmes, ‘Foreign Languages in Advertising Discourse’, Advertising as Multilingual Communication (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004), pp. 27–54.

37. T. Bhatia, ‘Discourse Functions and Pragmatics of Mixing: Advertising Across Cultures’, World Englishes, 11/2–3, 1992, pp. 195–215.

38. Keiko Tanaka, ‘Covert Communication’, Advertising Language: A Pragmatic Approach to Advertisements in Britain and Japan (London: Routledge, 1994), pp. 36–58.

39. Jian Wang, ‘China’s Encounter with Global Advertising Culture’, Foreign Advertising in China: Becoming Global, Becoming Local (Iowa City: Iowa State Press, 2000), pp. 3–16.

40. Helen Kelly-Holmes, ‘The Discourse of Western Marketing Professionals in Central and Eastern Europe: Their Role in the Creation of a Context for Marketing and Advertising Messages’,Discourse and Society, 9, 1998, pp. 339–62.

41. Karen Smith, ‘Rhetorical Figures and the Translation of Advertising Headlines’, Language and Literature, 15, 2006, pp. 159–82.

Part 6: Ads, Gender, and Sexuality

42. D. MacCannell, ‘Sex Sells: Comment on Gender Images and Myth in Advertising’, in J. Umiker-Sebeok (ed.), Marketing and Semiotics (Amsterdam: Mouton de Gruyter, 1987), pp. 521–31.

43. R. Lewis and K. Rolley, ‘(Ad)dressing the Dyke: Lesbian Looks and Lesbian Looking’, in M. Nava, A. Blake, I. MacRury, and B. Richards (eds.), Buy This Book: Studies in Advertising and Consumption (London: Routledge, 1997), pp. 291–308.

44. Anne Cronin, ‘Female Visions: Advertising, Women and Narrative’, Advertising and Consumer Citizenship: Gender, Images and Rights (London: Routledge, 2000), pp. 105–33.

45. Keiko Tanaka, ‘Images of Women’, Advertising Language: A Pragmatic Approach to Advertisements in Britain and Japan (London: Routledge, 1994), pp. 107–31.

46. Louise Mullany, ‘"Become the Man that Women Desire": Gender Identities and Dominant Discourses in E-mail Advertising Language’, Language and Literature, 13, 2004, pp. 291–305.

47. A. Thorne and J. Coupland, ‘Articulation of Same-Sex Desire: Lesbian and Gay-Male Dating Advertisements’, Journal of Sociolinguistics, 2, 2, 1998, pp. 233–57.

48. David Machin and Joanna Thornborrow, ‘Branding and Discourse: The Case of Cosmopolitan’, Discourse and Society, 14, 2003, pp. 453–71.

VOLUME THREE: Modes, Media, And Case Studies

Part 7: Multimodal Communication

49. Roland Barthes, ‘The Rhetoric of the Image’, Image, Music, Text, trans. S. Heath (London: Fontana, 1977), pp. 32–51.

50. Gunther Kress and Theo Van Leeuwen, ‘Introduction’, Multimodal Discourse (London: Arnold, 2001), pp. 1–23.

51. Ruth Finnegan, ‘A Mix of Arts’, Communicating: The Multiple Modes of Human Interconnection (London: Routledge, 2002), pp. 223–43.

52. Ron Scollon and Suzie Wong Scollon, ‘Place Semiotics: Emplacement’, Discourse in Place: Language in the Material World (London: Routledge, 2003), pp. 142–65.

53. Charles Forceville, ‘Pictorial Metaphors in Advertisements and Billboards: Case Studies’, Pictorial Metaphors in Advertising (London: Routledge, 1996), pp. 108–26.

54. Guy Cook, ‘Pictures, Music, Speech and Writing’, The Discourse of Advertising (London: Routledge, 2001), pp. 42–63.

55. C. Cinquin, ‘Homo Coca-Colens: From Marketing to Semiotics and Politics’, in J. Umiker-Sebeok (ed.), Marketing and Semiotics (Amsterdam: Mouton de Gruyter, 1987), pp. 485–95.

56. T. Kehret-Ward, ‘Combining Products in Use: How the Syntax of Product Use Affects Marketing Decisions’, in J. Umiker-Sebeok (ed.), Marketing and Semiotics (Amsterdam: Mouton de Gruyter, 1987), pp. 219–38.

57. T. Pateman, ‘How is Understanding an Advertisement Possible’, in H. Davis and P. Walton (eds.), Language, Image, Media (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1985), pp. 187–204.

Part 8: Case Studies—Products and Campaigns

58. P. Falk, ‘The Benetton-Toscani Effect: Testing the Limits of Conventional Advertising’, in M. Nava, A. Blake, I. MacRury, and B. Richards (eds.), Buy This Book: Studies in Advertising and Consumption (London: Routledge, 1997), pp. 64–83.

59. Iain MacRury, ‘Advertising and the Modulation of Narcissism: The Case of Adultery’, in M. Nava, A. Blake, I. MacRury, and B. Richards (eds.), Buy This Book: Studies in Advertising and Consumption (London: Routledge, 1997), pp. 239–54.

60. D. Bolinger, ‘A Last Case in Point: Blue Noses and Coffin Nails’, Language: The Loaded Weapon (London: Longman, 1980), pp. 156–63.

61. J. Stauber and S. Rampton, ‘Smokers’ Hacks’, Toxic Sludge is Good for You: Lies, Damn Lies and the Public Relations Industry (Monroe, ME: Common Courage Press, 1995), pp. 25–32.

62. M. Talbot, ‘It’s Good to Talk? The Undermining of Feminism in a British Telecom Advertisement’, Journal of Sociolinguistics, 4, 2000, pp. 108–19.

63. Elsa S. L. Freitas, ‘Summarising: Sanpro Ads’, Taboo in Advertising: A Textual Study of Portuguese and UK Magazine and Television Advertisements (Unpublished Ph.D. thesis, University of Lancaster, 2003), pp. 187–211.

64. Mike Reynolds, ‘How Does Monsanto Do It? An Ethnographic Case Study of an Advertising Campaign’, Text, 24, 2004, pp. 329–52.

65. Adriana Bolívar, ‘Changes in Venezuelan Political Dialogue: The Role of Advertising During Electoral Campaigns’, Discourse and Society, 12, 2001, pp. 23–45.

66. Guy Cook and Kieran O’Halloran, ‘Label Literacy: Factors Affecting the Understanding and Assessment of Baby Food Labels’, in T. O’Brien (ed.), Language and Literacies, BAAL Studies in Applied Linguistics 14 (British Association for Applied Linguistics in Association with Multilingual Matters, 1999), pp. 145–57.

67. P. Fuertes-Olivera, M. Velasco-Sacristan, A. Arribas-Bano, and E. Samaniego-Fernandez, ‘Persuasion and Advertising English: Metadiscourse in Slogans and Headlines’, Journal of Pragmatics, 33, 2001, pp. 1291–307.

68. Friedrich Ungerer, ‘Ads as News Stories, News Stories as Ads: The Interaction of Advertisements and Editorial Texts in Newspapers’, Text, 24, 2004, pp. 307–28.

69. Peter T. Robbins, ‘Global Visions and Globalizing Corporations: An Analysis of Images and Texts from Fortune Global 500 Companies’, Sociological Research Online, 2004 (www.socresonline.org.uk).

VOLUME FOUR: Public Relations and Brands; Insiders and Critics

Part 9: Public Relations and Brands

70. Kevin Moloney, ‘PR from Top to Bottom’, Rethinking Public Relations: The Spin and the Substance (London: Routledge, 2000), pp. 1–30.

71. Kevin Moloney, ‘Markets, Branding, Reputation’, Rethinking Public Relations: The Spin and the Substance (London: Routledge, 2000), pp. 134–49.

72. J. Stauber and S. Rampton, ‘The Art of the Hustle and the Science of Propaganda’, Toxic Sludge is Good for You: Lies, Damn Lies and the Public Relations Industry (Monroe, ME: Common Courage Press, 1995), pp. 17–25.

73. J. Swales and P. Rogers, ‘Discourse and the Projection of Corporate Culture: The Mission Statement’, Discourse and Society, 6/2, 1995, pp. 233–42.

74. Greg Myers, ‘Products, Brands and Signs’, Ad Worlds: Brands, Media, Audience (London: Arnold, 1999), pp. 17–34.

75. Deborah Cameron, ‘Talk as Enterprise: Communication and Culture Change at Work’, Good to Talk? Living and Working in a Communication Culture (London: Sage, 2000), pp. 53–90.

76. Gerlinde Mautner, ‘The Entrepreneurial University: A Discursive Profile of the Higher-Education Buzzword’, Critical Discourse Studies, 2/2, 2005, pp. 95–120.

77. Guy Cook, ‘"This We Have Done": The Different Vagueness of Poetry And PR’, in Joan Cutting (ed.), Vague Language Explored (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007).

Part 10: Advertising—Some Insider Views

78. J. Goddard, ‘Editorial’, in International Journal of Advertising, 1985 (from M. Alvarado and J. Thompson (eds.), The Media Reader (London: British Film Institute, 1990), pp. 205–8).

79. David Ogilvy, ‘What’s Wrong with Advertising’, Ogilvy on Advertising (London: Prion, 1985), pp. 206–16.

80. David Ogilvy, ‘I Predict 13 Changes’, Ogilvy on Advertising (London: Prion, 1985), p. 217.

81. A. Lury, ‘Advertising Moving Beyond Stereotypes’, in R. Keat, N. Whiteley, and N. Abercrombie (eds.), The Authority of the Consumer (London: Routledge, 1994), pp. 91–102.

82. J. Wilmshurst and A. Mackay, ‘How Advertising is Created’, The Fundamentals of Advertising (Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann, 1999), pp. 185–202.

83. R. White, ‘Advertising and Society’, Advertising, 2nd edn. (London: McGraw Hill, 1988), pp. 176–82.

84. N. Ind, ‘The Corporate Brand’, The Corporate Brand (Basingstoke: Macmillan Business, 1997), pp. 1–14.

85. S. Brierley, ‘Principles of Persuasion’, The Advertising Handbook, 2nd edn. (London: Routledge, 2002), pp. 137–50.

Part 11: Against Advertising

86. E. Clark, ‘The Advertising Industry’, The Want Makers: Lifting the Lid off the World Advertising Industry (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1988), pp. 23–58.

87. Naomi Klein, ‘Culture Jamming’, No Logo: No Space, No Choice, No Jobs—Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies (London: Flamingo, 2000), pp. 279–309.

88. Adbusters, ‘Global Teens Growing Indifferent to Brand America’, 2006 (www.adbusters.org).

Name: The Language of Advertising: Major Themes in English Studies (Hardback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by Guy Cook. Advertising is one of the most prominent, powerful, and ubiquitous contemporary uses of language. Its seductive and controversial quality has attracted consistent and intense attention across a range of academic disciplines including linguistics, media...
Categories: Advertising Studies, Mass Media & Communication, Discourse Analysis, Language and Communication, General Reference, Language and Media