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Politics of Modern Taiwan

Edited by Dafydd Fell

Routledge – 2009 – 1,669 pages

Series: Critical Issues in Modern Politics

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    978-0-415-44041-7
    May 2nd 2008

Description

This new Routledge Major Work is a four-volume collection which gathers the best and most influential research on the contemporary politics of Taiwan. Although the collected materials are in English, they include contributions from leading Taiwan experts in Europe, the United States, Japan, and Taiwan.

Volumes I (‘Nationalism and National Identity’) and II (‘Democratization, Democratic Consolidation’) address the two key issues that have received the most attention from political scientists working on Taiwan. Gathered here is the best research on competing nation-building projects and national identities, including the ‘Taiwanese versus Chinese’ identity debate. Various explanations for Taiwan’s democratic transition are explored in depth. Other topics include religion and democracy, along with appraisals of Taiwan’s democratic consolidation and its current state.

The scholarship collected in Volume III (‘Consequences of Democratization’) examines the policy implications of democratization while the last volume (‘Party and Local Politics’) focuses on salient issues in Taiwan’s domestic politics. There is a growing literature addressing a broad range of aspects of the island’s political development since the advent of multi-party politics in the late 1980s. Volumes III and IV pay particular attention to the following topics: political corruption; constitutional reform; the creation of a social welfare system; party systems and party politics; political communication and electoral politics; changing patterns in local politics; the development of social movements; and the political impact of the change in ruling parties in 2000.

Politics of Modern Taiwan is fully indexed and has a comprehensive introduction, newly written by the editor, which places the collected material in its historical and intellectual context. It is an essential work of reference and is destined to be valued by scholars and students as a vital one-stop research and pedagogic resource.

Contents

Volume I: Nationalism and National Identity

Part 1: Contexts

1. Chu Yun-han and Jih-wen Lin, ‘Political Development in 20th-Century Taiwan: State-Building, Regime Transformation and the Construction of National Identity’, China Quarterly, 165, 2001, pp. 102–29.

2. Thomas Gold, ‘Taiwan Society at the Fin de Siècle’, China Quarterly, 148, 1996, pp. 1091–114.

Part 2: Competing Nation-Building Projects and National Identities

3. Thomas Gold, ‘Taiwan’s Quest for Identity in the Shadow of China’, in Steve Tsang (ed.), In the Shadow of China: Political Developments in Taiwan Since 1949 (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1993), pp. 169–92.

4. Allen Chun, ‘From Nationalism to Nationalizing: Cultural Imagination and State Formation in Postwar Taiwan’, Australian Journal of Chinese Affairs, 31, 1994, pp. 49–69.

5. Alan Wachman, ‘Competing Identities in Taiwan’, in Murray Rubinstein (ed.), The Other Taiwan: 1945 to the Present (Armonk: M. E. Sharpe, 1994), pp. 17–80.

6. Lin Chia-long, ‘The Political Formation of Taiwanese Nationalism’, in Stéphane Corcuff (ed.), Memories of the Future: National Identity Issues and the Search for a New Taiwan (Armonk: M. E. Sharpe, 2002), pp. 219–41.

7. Christopher Hughes, ‘Post Nationalist Taiwan’, in Michael Leifer (ed.), Asian Nationalism (London: Routledge, 2001), pp. 63–81.

8. Daniel Lynch, ‘Taiwan’s Self-Conscious Nation-Building Project’, Asian Survey, 44, 4, 2004, pp. 513–33.

9. Jean-Pierre Cabestan, ‘Specificities and Limits of Taiwanese Nationalism’, China Perspectives, 62, 2005, pp. 32–43.

Part 3: Measuring National Identities

10. Ho Szu-yin and Liu I-chou, ‘The Taiwanese/Chinese Identity of the Taiwan People in the 1990s’, in Lee Wei-chin and T. Y. Wang (eds.), Sayonara to the Lee Teng-hui Era: Politics in Taiwan, 1988–2000 (Lanham: University Press of America, 2002), pp. 149–84.

11. Emerson Niou, ‘A New Measure of Preferences on the Independence-Unification Issue in Taiwan’, Journal of Asian and African Studies, 40, 1/2, 2005, pp. 91–104.

12. Stéphane Corcuff, ‘Taiwan’s New Mainlanders New Taiwanese?’, in Corcuff (ed.), Memories of the Future National Identity Issues and the Search for a New Taiwan (Armonk: M. E. Sharpe, 2002), pp. 163–95.

Part 4: Symbolic Dimensions of National Identity

13. Robert Edmondson, ‘The February 28 Incident and National Identity’, in Stéphane Corcuff (ed.), Memories of the Future: National Identity Issues and the Search for a New Taiwan (Armonk: M. E. Sharpe, 2002), pp. 25–46.

14. Jeremy Taylor, ‘The Production of the Chiang Kai-shek Personality Cult’, The China Quarterly, 185, 2006, pp. 96–110.

15. Phil Deans, ‘Isolation, Identity and Taiwanese Stamps as Vehicles for Regime Legitimation’, East Asia: An International Quarterly, 22, 2, 2005, pp. 8–30.

Volume II: Democratization, Democratic Consolidation

Part 5: Contexts

16. Cheng Tun-jen, ‘Democratizing a Quasi-Leninist Regime in Taiwan’, World Politics, 41, 4, 1989, pp. 471–99.

Part 6: Democratic Transition

17. Shelley Rigger, ‘Voting for Democracy’, Politics in Taiwan: Voting For Democracy (London: Routledge, 1998), pp. 1–33.

18. Linda Chao and Ramon Myers, ‘How Elections Promoted Democracy in Taiwan under Martial Law’, The China Quarterly, 162, 2000, pp. 387–409.

19. Lin Jih-wen, ‘Democratization under One-party Dominance: Explaining Taiwan’s Paradoxical Transition’, Issues and Studies, 35, 6, 1999, pp. 1–28.

20. John Higley, Huang Tong-yi, and Lin Tse-min, ‘Elite Settlements in Taiwan’, Journal of Democracy, 9, 2, 1998, pp. 148–64.

21. Lin Jih-wen, ‘Transition through Transaction: Taiwan’s Constitutional Reforms in the Lee Teng-hui’, in Lee Wei-chin and T. Y. Wang (eds.), Sayonara to the Lee Teng-hui Era: Politics in Taiwan, 1988–2000 (Lanham: University Press of America, 2002), pp. 63–89.

Part 7: Religion and Democracy

22. Murray Rubinstein, ‘The Presbyterian Church in the Formation of Taiwan’s Democratic Society, 1945–2001’, in Cheng Tun-jen and Deborah Brown (eds.), Religious Organizations and Democratization: Case Studies from Contemporary Asia (Armonk: M. E. Sharpe, 2006), pp. 109–35.

23. André Laliberté, ‘Buddhism for the Human Realm and Taiwanese Democracy’, in Cheng Tun-jen and Deborah Brown (eds.), Religious Organizations and Democratization: Case Studies from Contemporary Asia (Armonk: M. E. Sharpe, 2006), pp. 55–82.

Part 8: Consolidation and Appraisals of the State of Taiwanese Democracy

24. Shelley Rigger, ‘The Unfinished Business of Taiwan’s Democratization’, in Nancy Berkopf Tucker (ed.), Dangerous Strait: The US-Taiwan-China Crisis (New York: University of Columbia Press, 2005), pp. 16–43.

25. Joseph Wong, ‘Deepening Democracy in Taiwan’, Pacific Affairs, 76, 2, 2003, pp. 235–56.

26. Kuo Cheng-tian, ‘Taiwan’s Distorted Democracy in Comparative Perspective’, Journal of Asian and African Studies, 35, 1, 2000, pp. 85–111.

27. Shih Chih-yu, ‘The Global Constitution of "Taiwan Democracy": Opening up the Image of a Successful State after 9/11’, East Asia: An International Quarterly, 20, 3, 2003, pp. 16–38.

28. Wu Nai-teh, ‘Transition without Justice or Justice without History’, Taiwan Journal of Democracy, 1, 1, 2005, pp. 77–102.

29. Teresa Wright, ‘Student Mobilization in Taiwan: Civil Society and its Discontents’, Asian Survey, 39, 6, 1999, pp. 986–1008.

30. Chen Ming-tong, ‘Local Factions and Elections in Taiwan’s Democratization’, in Tien Hung-mao, Taiwan’s Electoral Politics and Democratic Transition: Riding the Third Wave (Armonk: M. E. Sharpe, 1996), pp. 174–92.

Volume III: Consequences of Democratization

Part 9: Policy Implications of Democratization

31. Tang Shui-yan and Tang Ching-ping, ‘Democratization and the Environment: Entrepreneurial Politics and Interest Representation in Taiwan’, The China Quarterly, 158, 1999, pp. 350–66.

32. Kim Sunhyuk, ‘Democratization and Environmentalism: South Korea and Taiwan in Comparative Perspective’, Journal of Asian and African Studies, 35, 3, 2000, pp. 287–303.

33. Dafydd Fell, ‘Political and Media Liberalization and Political Corruption in Taiwan’, The China Quarterly, 184, 2005, pp. 875–93.

34. Christian Goebel, ‘Beheading the Hydra: Combating Political Corruption and Organised Crime in the KMT and DPP Eras’, in Dafydd Fell, Henning Kloeter, and Chang Bi-yu (eds.), What Has Changed? Taiwan Before and After the Change in Ruling Parties (Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2006), pp. 61–82.

35. Joseph Wong, ‘Resisting Reform: The Politics of Healthcare in Democratizing Taiwan’, American Asian Review, 21, 2, 2003, pp. 57–90.

36. Stéphane Corcuff, ‘History Textbooks, Identity Politics and Ethnic Introspection in Taiwan’,in Edward Vickers and Alisa Jones(eds.), History Education and National Identity in East Asia (New York: Routledge, 2005), pp. 133–69.

Part 10: Policy Implications of Competing Identities

37. Richard Bush, ‘Lee Teng-hui and Separatism’, in Nancy Berkopf Tucker (ed.), Dangerous Strait: The US-Taiwan-China Crisis (New York: University of Columbia Press, 2005), pp. 70–92.

38. Gunter Schubert, ‘Taiwan’s Political Parties and National Identity’, Asian Survey, 44, 4, 2004, pp. 534–54.

39. Wu Yu-shan, ‘Taiwan’s Domestic Politics and Cross-Strait Relations’, China Journal, 53, 2005, pp. 35–60.

40. Hsieh John Fuh-sheng, ‘Ethnicity, National Identity and Domestic Politics in Taiwan’, Journal of Asian and African Studies, 40, 1/2, 2005, pp. 13–28.

41. Chu Yun-han (2004), ‘Taiwan’s National Identity Politics and the Prospect of Cross-Strait Relations’, Asian Survey, 44, 4, 2004, pp. 484–512.

42. Lin Cheng-yi and Lin Wen-cheng, ‘Democracy, Divided National Identity, and Taiwan’s National Security’, Taiwan Journal of Democracy, 1, 2, 2005, pp. 69–87.

43.Gary Rawnsley, ‘Democratisation and Election Campaigning in Taiwan: Professionalizing the Professionals’, in Katrin Voltmer (ed.), Mass Media and Political Communication in New Democracies (London: Routledge, 2006), pp. 133–51.

44. Mikael Mattlin, ‘Party Opportunism among Local Politicians after Taiwan’s Power Transition’, East Asia: An International Quarterly, 23, 1, 2006, pp. 68–85.

45. Ho Ming-sho, ‘Neo-Centrist Labour Policy in Practice: The DPP and Taiwanese Working Class’, in Dafydd Fell, Henning Kloeter, and Chang Bi-yu (eds.), What has changed? Taiwan Before and After the Change in Ruling Parties (Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2006), pp. 129–46.

46. Ho Ming-sho, ‘Weakened State and Social Movement: The Paradox of Taiwanese Environmental Politics after the Power Transition’, Journal of Contemporary China, 14, 43, 2005, pp. 339–52.

Volume IV: Party and Local Politics

Part 11: Introducing Taiwan’s Electoral Politics

47. Hsieh John Fuh-sheng, ‘Change and Continuity in Taiwan’s Electoral Politics’, in John Hsieh and David Newman (eds.), How Asia Votes (New York: Chatham House Publishers, 2002), pp. 32–49.

Part 12: Multi-party Politics

48. Cheng Tun-jen and Hsu Yung-ming, ‘Issue Structure, the DPP’s Factionalism and Party Realignment’, in Tien Hung-mao (ed.), Taiwan’s Electoral Politics and Democratic Transition: Riding the Third Wave (Armonk: M. E. Sharpe, 1996), pp. 137–74.

49. Yu Ching-hsin, ‘The Evolution of Party System in Taiwan, 1995–2004’, Journal of Asian and African Studies, 40, 1/2, 2005, pp. 105–29.

50. Lin Chiung-chu, ‘The Evolution of Party Images and Party System in Taiwan, 1992–2004’, East Asia: An International Quarterly, 23, 1, 2006, pp. 27–46.

51. Dafydd Fell, ‘Measuring and Explaining Party Change in Taiwan’, Journal of East Asian Studies, 5, 1, 2005, pp. 105–33.

52. Hans Stockton, ‘Political Parties, Party Systems, and Democracy in East Asia’, Comparative Political Studies, 34, 1, 2001, pp. 94–120.

53. Alexander Tan, Kyung-Tae Kang Karl Ho, and Yu Tsung-Chi, ‘What If We Don’t Party? Political Partisanship in Taiwan and Korea in the 1990s’, Journal of Asian and African Studies, 35, 1, 2000, pp. 67–85.

54. Dafydd Fell, ‘Success and Failure of New Parties in Taiwanese Elections’, China: An International Journal, 3, 2, 2005, pp. 212–39.

Part 13: Single-Party Studies

55. Bruce Dickson, ‘Lessons of Defeat: The Reorganization of the Kuomintang on Taiwan, 1950–52’, The China Quarterly, 133, 1993, pp. 56–84.

56. John Fuh-sheng Hsieh, ‘Whither the KMT?’, China Quarterly, 168, 2001, pp. 930–43.

57. Shelley Rigger, ‘The Democratic Progressive Party in 2000: Obstacles and Opportunities’, China Quarterly, 168, 2001, pp. 944–59.

Part 14: Candidate Selection

58. Wu Chung-li, ‘The Transformation of the Kuomintang’s Candidate Selection System’, Party Politics, 7, 1, 2001, pp. 103–18.

59. Dafydd Fell, ‘Democratization of Candidate Selection in Taiwanese Political Parties’, Journal of Electoral Studies, 13, 2, 2006, pp. 167–98.

Part 15: Local and Factional Politics

60. Kuo Cheng-tian, ‘The Origins of State-Local Relations in Taiwan’, Issues and Studies, 35, 6, 1999, pp. 29–58.

61. Joseph Bosco, ‘Taiwan Factions: Guanxi, Patronage, and the State in Local Politics’, Ethnology, 31, 2, 1992, pp. 157–83.

62. Steven Hood, ‘Political Change in Taiwan: The Rise of Kuomintang Factions’, Asian Survey, 36, 5, 1996, pp. 468–82.

63. Tsai Chia-hung, ‘Policy Making, Local Factions and Candidate Coordination in SNTV: A Case Study of Taiwan’, Party Politics, 11, 1, 2005, pp. 59–77.

Author Bio

Dafydd Fell is the Lecturer in Taiwan Studies at the Department of Political Studies and Centre for Financial and Management Studies of the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS). He is also the Deputy Director of the SOAS Centre of Taiwan Studies and coordinator of the European Association of Taiwan Studies. He teaches courses on Taiwan politics and Taiwan society and culture. He is the convenor of the MA in Taiwan Studies. He has published articles on inter-party competition, inner party democracy, the women’s movement, political corruption, and electioneering in Taiwan. His first book was Party Politics in Taiwan (Routledge, 2005) which looks at party platform change in Taiwan’s first fifteen years of multi-party politics. He has just completed an edited volume examining the impact of the island’s first change in ruling parties in 2000. He is now working on a book analysing patterns and consequences of inner-party democracy in Taiwanese parties.

Name: Politics of Modern Taiwan (Hardback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by Dafydd Fell. This new Routledge Major Work is a four-volume collection which gathers the best and most influential research on the contemporary politics of Taiwan. Although the collected materials are in English, they include contributions from leading Taiwan experts...
Categories: Asian Studies, Politics & International Relations, Asian Politics