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Changing Teacher Professionalism

International trends, challenges and ways forward

Edited by Sharon Gewirtz, Pat Mahony, Ian Hextall, Alan Cribb

Routledge – 2008 – 236 pages

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  • Add to CartPaperback: $54.95
    978-0-415-46778-0
    December 9th 2008
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    978-0-415-46777-3
    December 8th 2008

Description

Significant changes in the policy and social context of teaching over the last 30 years have had substantial implications for teacher professionalism. As the influence of central regulation and marketisation has increased, so the scope for professional influence on policy and practice has in many cases diminished. Instead, teachers have had to respond to a range of other demands stemming from broader social changes, including greater public scepticism towards professional authority combined with demands for public services that are more responsive to diverse cultural and social identities.

This collection of work by leading international scholars in the field makes a unique contribution to understanding both how these changes are impacting on teaching and how teachers might change their practice for the better. The central premise of the book is that if research is going to be helpful in improving professional learning and the quality of teachers’ practice, the full potential of three broad approaches to research on teacher professionalism needs to be brought to bear on these issues:

  • research on the changing political and social context of professional work and practice
  • research on the working lives and lived experiences of teachers, and
  • research on how teachers’ professional practices might be enhanced.

In bringing together and drawing out the complementarities of these three approaches, this book represents a ground-breaking collection of work.

Contents

Preface 1 Policies, professionalism and practices: understanding and enhancing teachers’ work Part 1 The changing context of professionalism 2 The management of professionalism: a contemporary paradox 3 Professional roles and the division of ethical labour 4 The rise of the citizen-consumer: implications for public service professionalism 5 Peculiarities of the English? International policy orthodoxy and ‘national cultures’ of teaching Part 2 Living professionalism 6 Neo-liberal reform and teachers’ work: the case of Chicago 7 Pedagogising teacher professional identities: beyond care 8 Becoming a black manager 9 Inventing the Chartered Teacher: a clash of professionalities? 10 On the making and taking of professionalism in the further education workplace 11 Working in a ‘new’ university: pressures and possibilities, identity and culture Part 3 Enhancing professionalism 12 Making teacher change happen 13 Improving schoolteachers’ professional learning: workplace practices and cultures, organisational structures and government policy 14 Research-based teaching 15 The role of educational ideals in teachers’ professional work 16 Good teachers? The integrity of academic practice 17 Towards effective management of a reformed teaching profession

Author Bio

Sharon Gewirtz is Professor of Education in the Centre for Public Policy Research at King’s College London, UK. Pat Mahony is Assistant Dean (Research) at Roehampton University. Ian Hextall is Senior Research Fellow at Roehampton University. Alan Cribb is Professor of Bioethics and Education in the Centre for Public Policy Research at King’s College London, UK

Name: Changing Teacher Professionalism: International trends, challenges and ways forward (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by Sharon Gewirtz, Pat Mahony, Ian Hextall, Alan Cribb. Significant changes in the policy and social context of teaching over the last 30 years have had substantial implications for teacher professionalism. As the influence of central regulation and marketisation has increased, so the scope for professional...
Categories: Continuing Professional Development, School Leadership, Management & Administration, Teachers & Teacher Education, Education Politics