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Public Art, Memorials and Atlantic Slavery

Edited by Celeste-Marie Bernier, Judie Newman

Routledge – 2009 – 178 pages

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    978-0-415-85021-6
    December 12th 2013
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    January 20th 2009

Description

In this collection distinguished American and European scholars, curators and artists discuss major issues concerning the representation and commemoration of slavery, as brought into sharp focus by the 2007 bicentennial of the abolition of the slave trade. Writers consider nineteenth and twentieth century American and European images of African Americans, art installations, photography, literature, sculpture, exhibitions, performances, painting, film and material culture. This is essential reading for historians, cultural critics, art-historians, educationalists and museologists, in America as in Europe, and an important contribution to the understanding of the African diaspora, race, American and British history, heritage tourism, and transatlantic relations. Contributions include previously unpublished interview material with artists and practitioners, and a comprehensive review of the commemorative exhibitions of 2007. Illustrations include images from Louisiana, Maryland, and Virginia, many previously unpublished, in black and white, which challenge previous understandings of the aesthetics of slave representation.

This book was published as a special issue of Slavery and Abolition.

Contents

1. Public Art, Artefacts and Atlantic Slavery: Introduction Celeste-Marie Bernier and Judie Newman

2. Am I Not a Man and a Brother?: Phrenology and Anti-Slavery Cynthia Hamilton

3. Remembering Slavery in Birmingham: Sculpture, Paintings and Installations Andy Green

4. Speculation and the Imagination: History, Storytelling and the Body in Godfried Donkor’s Financial Times (2007) Celeste-Marie Bernier

5. "Doing Good While Doing Well": The Decision to Manufacture Products that Supported the Abolition of the Slave Trade & Slavery in Great Britain Martha Katz-Hyman

6. Sally Hemings in Visual Culture: A Radical Act of the Imagination? Sharon Monteith

7. Atlantic slavery and traumatic representation in museums: ‘The Great Blacks in Wax’ as a test case Marcus Wood

8. Interspatialism in the Nineteenth-Century South: The Natchez of Henry Norman John Stauffer

9. ‘A Limited Sort of Property’: History, Memory, and the Slave Ship, Zong Anita Rupprecht

10. Other Peoples’ History: Slavery, Refuge and Irish Citizenship in Dónal O Kelly’s The Cambria Fionnghuala Sweeney

11. Facing slavery’s past: the bicentenary of the abolition of the British slave trade Anthony Tibbles

Author Bio

Celeste-Marie Bernier is a Lecturer in the School of American and Canadian Studies, University of Nottingham, and the author of African American Visual Arts, University of North Carolina Press and Edinburgh University Press, 2008. She is currently writing a monograph for Routledge on Slave Heroism in the Transatlantic Imagination.

Judie Newman is Professor of American Studies at the University of Nottingham. Her most recent book is Fictions of America: Narratives of Global Empire, Routledge, 2007.

Name: Public Art, Memorials and Atlantic Slavery (Hardback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by Celeste-Marie Bernier, Judie Newman. In this collection distinguished American and European scholars, curators and artists discuss major issues concerning the representation and commemoration of slavery, as brought into sharp focus by the 2007 bicentennial of the abolition of the slave...
Categories: Race & Ethnicity, Imperial & Colonial History, Black Studies - Race & Ethnic Studies, Visual Arts