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Social Psychology

Edited by Richard J. Crisp

Routledge – 2010 – 2,040 pages

Series: Critical Concepts in Psychology

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    978-0-415-49940-8
    May 12th 2011

Description

Gordon W. Allport, one of social psychology’s founding fathers, described the subdiscipline as ‘an attempt to understand and explain how the thoughts, feelings and behavior of individuals are influenced by the actual, imagined or implied presence of others’. From pioneering studies in the 1940s and 1950s, via the ‘cognitive revolution’ of the 1970s, to the emergence of sophisticated computerized methodologies and the wonders of functional MRI, social psychology remains a thriving enterprise.

As serious work in social psychology continues to flourish as never before, this new title from Psychology Press meets the need for an authoritative reference work to map and make sense of a vast body of literature and a continuing explosion in research output. Edited by a leading scholar, Social Psychology is a four-volume collection which brings together the very best foundational and cutting-edge contributions. It is divided into four principal parts: Self and Social Cognition; Attitudes and Social Influence; Group Processes and Intergroup Relations; and Aggression and Love.

The collection is fully indexed and has a comprehensive introduction, newly written by the editor, which places the gathered material in its historical and intellectual context. Clearly delineating the subdiscipline’s key turning points and critical transitions, Social Psychology will provide users with a new and coherent understanding of the subdiscipline’s evolution. It is an essential resource and is destined to be valued by scholars and students as a vital one-stop research tool.

Contents

PROVISIONAL CONTENTS

Volume I: Self and Social Cognition

Part 1: The Self and Identity

The Self

1. H. Markus, ‘Self-schemata and Processing Information about the Self’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1977, 35, 63–78.

2. E. T. Higgins, ‘Self-discrepancy: A Theory Relating Self and Affect’, Psychological Review, 1987, 94, 319–40.

3. A. Tesser, ‘Toward a Self-evaluation Maintenance Model of Social Behaviour’, in L. Berkowitz (ed.), Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 21 (Academic Press, 1988), pp. 181–227.

4. C. Sedikides, ‘Assessment, Enhancement, and Verification Determinants of the Self-evaluation Process’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1993, 65, 317–38.

Social Identity

5. R. B. Cialdini et al., ‘Basking in Reflected Glory: Three Football Field Studies’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1976, 34, 366–75.

6. H. Tajfel and J. C. Turner, ‘An Integrative Theory of Intergroup Conflict: The Social Identity Theory of Intergroup Behaviour’, in W. G. Austin and S. Worchel (eds.), The Social Psychology of Intergroup Relations (Brooks/Cole, 1979), pp. 33–47.

Multicultural Self

7. Y. Hong et al., ‘Multicultural Minds: A Dynamic Constructivist Approach to Culture and Cognition’, American Psychologist, 2000, 55, 709–20.

Part 2: Social Cognition

Attribution

8. H. H. Kelley and J. L. Michela, ‘Attribution Theory and Research’, Annual Review of Psychology, 1980, 31, 457–501.

9. M. D. Storms, ‘Videotape and the Attribution Process: Reversing Actor’s and Observer’s Points of View’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1973, 27, 165–75.

10. L. Ross, D. Greene, and P. House, ‘The "False Consensus Effect": An Egocentric Bias in Social Perception and Attribution Processes’, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 1977, 13, 279–301.

Social Cognition

11. A. Tversky and D. Kahneman, ‘Judgement under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases’, Science, 1974, 185, 1124–31.

12. N. Schwarz et al., ‘Ease of Retrieval as Information: Another Look at the Availability Heuristic’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1991, 61, 195–202.

13. J. A. Bargh, M. Chen, and L. Burrows, ‘The Automaticity of Social Behaviour: Direct Effects of Trait Concept and Stereotype Activation on Action’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1996, 71, 230–44.

Stereotyping

14. D. L. Hamilton and R. K. Gifford, ‘Illusory Correlation in Interpersonal Personal Perception: A Cognitive Basis of Stereotypic Judgements’, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 1976, 12, 392–407.

15. S. T. Fiske and S. L. Neuberg, ‘A Continuum of Impression Formation, from Category-based to Individuating Processes: Influences of Information and Motivation on Attention and Interpretation’, in L. Berkowitz (ed.), Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 23 (Academic Press, 1990), pp. 1–74.

16. P. G. Devine, ‘Stereotypes and Prejudice: Their Automatic and Controlled Components’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1989, 56, 5–18.

17. C. N. Macrae et al., ‘Out of Mind but Back in Sight: Stereotypes on the Rebound’, Journal of Personality & Social Psychology, 1994, 67, 808–17.

18. C. M. Steele, ‘A Threat in the Air: How Stereotypes Shape Intellectual Identity and Performance’, American Psychologist, 1997, 52, 613–29.

Implicit Prejudice

19. A. G. Greenwald, D. E. McGhee, and J. L. K. Schwartz, ‘Measuring Individual Differences in Implicit Cognition: The Implicit Association Test’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1998, 74, 1464–80.

20. W. A. Cunningham et al., ‘Separable Neural Components in the Processing of Black and White Faces’, Psychological Science, 2004, 15, 806–13.

Reducing Stereotyping

21. G. B. Moskowitz et al., ‘Preconscious Control of Stereotype Activation through Chronic Egalitarian Goals’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1999, 77, 167–84.

22. I. V. Blair, J. E. Ma, and A. P. Lenton, ‘Imagining Stereotypes Away: The Moderation of Implicit Stereotypes through Mental Imagery’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2001, 81, 828–41.

Volume II: Attitudes and Social Influence

Part 3: Attitudes

Attitude Formation

23. R. B. Zajonc, ‘Attitudinal Effects of Mere Exposure’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1968, 9, 1–27.

24. C. K. Staats and A. W. Staats, ‘Attitudes Established by Classical Conditioning’, Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1958, 57, 37–40.

25. J. T. Cacioppo et al., ‘Rudimentary Determinants of Attitudes: Classical Conditioning is More Effective when Prior Knowledge about the Attitude Stimulus is Low than High’, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 1992, 28, 207–33.

Attitudes and Behaviour

26. M. Fishbein and I. Ajzen, ‘Attitudes Towards Objects as Predictors of Single and Multiple Behavioral Criteria’, Psychological Review, 1974, 81, 59–75.

27. R. H. Fazio and C. J. Williams, ‘Attitude Accessibility as a Moderator of the Attitude-Perception and Attitude-Behaviour Relationship: An Investigation of the 1984 Presidential Election’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1986, 51, 505–14.

Attitude Change

28. L. Festinger and J. M. Carlsmith, ‘Cognitive Consequences of Forced Compliance’, Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1959, 58, 203–11.

29. D. J. Bem, ‘Self-perception: An Alternative Interpretation of Cognitive Dissonance Phenomena’, Psychological Review, 1967, 74, 183–200.

30. S. Chaiken and M. W. Baldwin, ‘Affective-Cognitive Consistency and Effect of Salient Behavioural Information on the Self-perception of Attitudes’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1981, 41, 1–12.

31. F. Strack, S. Martin, and L. L. Stepper, ‘Inhibiting and Facilitating Conditions of Facial Expressions: A Non-obtrusive Test of the Facial Feedback Hypothesis’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1988, 54, 768–77.

32. C. I. Hovland and W. Weiss, ‘The Influence of Source Credibility on Communication Effectiveness’, Public Opinion Quarterly, 1951, 15, 635–50.

33. R. E. Petty and J. T. Cacioppo, ‘The Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion’, in L. Berkowitz (ed.), Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 19 (Academic Press, 1986), pp. 123–205.

Part 4: Social Influence

34. S. Milgram, ‘Behavioral Study of Obedience’, Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1963, 67, 371–8.

Majority Influence

35. S. E. Asch, ‘Opinions and Social Pressure’, Scientific American, 1956, 193, 31–5.

36. M. Deutsch and H. B. Gerard, ‘A Study of Normative and Informational Influences upon Individual Judgment’, Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1955, 51, 629–36.

37. V. L. Allen and J. M. Levine, ‘Social Support and Conformity: The Role of Independent Assessment of Reality’, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 1971, 7, 48–58.

Minority Influence

38. S. Moscovici, E. Lage, and M. Naffrechoux, ‘Influence in a Consistent Minority on the Responses of a Majority in a Color Perception Task’, Sociometry, 1969, 32, 365–79.

39. C. Nemeth, ‘Differential Contributions of Majority and Minority Influence Processes’, Psychological Review, 1986, 93, 10–20.

40. L. Pendry and R. Carrick, ‘Doing what the Mob Do: Priming Effects on Conformity’, European Journal of Social Psychology, 2001, 31, 83–92.

Attitudes and Influence

41. B. Latané, ‘The Psychology of Social Impact’, American Psychologist, 1981, 36, 343–56.

42. W. D. Crano and R. Prislin, ‘Attitudes and Persuasion’, Annual Review of Psychology, 2006, 57, 345–74.

Volume III: Group Processes and Intergroup Relations

Part 5: Group Processes

43. R. B. Zajonc, ‘Social Facilitation’, Science, 1965, 149, 269–74.

44. N. B. Cottrell et al., ‘Social Facilitation of Dominant Responses by the Presence of an Audience and the Mere Presence of Others’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1968, 9, 245–50.

45. B. Latané, K. Williams, and S. Harkins, ‘Many Hands Make Light Work: The Causes and Consequences of Social Loafing’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1979, 37, 822–32.

46. J. M. Jackson and K. D. Williams, ‘Social Loafing on Difficult Tasks: Working Collectively can Improve Performance’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1985, 49, 937–42.

Leadership

47. T. A. Judge et al., ‘Personality and Leadership: A Qualitative and Quantitative Review’, Journal of Applied Psychology, 2002, 87, 765–80.

48. M. A. Hogg and D. van Knippenberg, ‘Social Identity and Leadership Processes in Groups’, Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 2003, 35, 1–52.

Prosocial Behaviour

49. J. M. Darley and B. Latané, ‘Bystander Intervention in Emergencies: Diffusion of Responsibility’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1968, 8, 100–8.

50. C. D. Batson et al., ‘Is Empathic Emotion a Source of Altruistic Motivation?’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1981, 40, 290–302.

51. S. M. Garcia et al., ‘Crowded Minds: The Implicit Bystander Effect’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2002, 83, 843–53.

Social Exclusion

52. K. D. Williams, ‘Ostracism’, Annual Review of Psychology, 2007, 58, 425–52.

Part 6: Intergroup Relations

Intergroup Relations

53. J. Jetten, R. Spears, and A. S. R. Manstead, ‘Intergroup Norms and Intergroup Discrimination: Distinctive Self-categorization and Social Identity Effects’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1996, 71, 1222–33.

54. M. Rubin and M. Hewstone, ‘Social Identity Theory’s Self-esteem Hypothesis: A Review and Some Suggestions for Clarification’, Personality and Social Psychology Review, 1998, 2, 40–62.

55. D. M. Mackie, T. Devos, and E. R. Smith, ‘Intergroup Emotions: Explaining Offensive Action Tendencies in an Intergroup Context’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2000, 79, 602–16.

56. M. Hewstone, M. Rubin, and H. Willis, ‘Intergroup Bias’, Annual Review of Psychology, 2002, 53, 575–604.

Improving Intergroup Relations

57. S. L. Gaertner et al., ‘Reducing Intergroup Bias: The Benefits of Recategorization’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1989, 57, 239–49.

58. R. J. Crisp and M. Hewstone, ‘Multiple Social Categorization’, in M. P. Zanna (ed.), Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 39 (Academic Press, 2007), pp. 163–254.

59. T. F. Pettigrew, ‘Intergroup Contact Theory’, Annual Review of Psychology, 1998, 47, 65–85.

60. S. C. Wright et al., ‘The Extended Contact Effect: Knowledge of Cross-group Friendships and Prejudice’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1997, 73, 73–90.

61. R. J. Crisp and R. N. Turner, ‘Can Imagined Interactions Produce Positive Perceptions? Reducing Prejudice through Simulated Social Contact’, American Psychologist, 2009, 64, 231–40.

Volume IV: Aggression and Love

Part 7: Aggression

Frustration-Aggression

62. L. Berkowitz, ‘The Frustration-Aggression Hypothesis: An Examination and Reformulation’, Psychological Bulletin, 1989, 106, 59–73.

Modelling

63. A. Bandura, D. Ross, and S. A. Ross, ‘Transmission of Aggression through Imitation of Aggressive Models’, Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1961, 63, 575–82.

64. C. A. Anderson and B. J. Bushman, ‘Effects of Violent Video Games on Aggressive Behaviour, Aggressive Cognition, Aggressive Affect, Physiological Arousal, and Prosocial Behaviour: A Meta-analytic Review of the Scientific Literature’, Psychological Science, 2001, 12, 353–9.

65. T. Greitemeyer and S. Osswald, ‘Prosocial Video Games Reduce Aggressive Cognitions’, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 2009.

Personality

66. R. F. Baumeister, L. Smart, and J. M. Boden, ‘Relation of Threatened Egotism to Violence and Aggression: The Dark Side of High Self-esteem’, Psychological Review, 1996, 103, 5–33.

Alcohol

67. B. J. Bushman and H. M. Cooper, ‘Effects of Alcohol on Human Aggression: An Integrative Research Review’, Psychological Bulletin, 1990, 107, 341–54.

Temperature

68. C. A. Anderson, B. J. Bushman, and R. W. Groom, ‘Hot Years and Serious Deadly Assault: Empirical Tests of the Heat Hypothesis’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1997, 73, 1213–23.

69. C. N. DeWall and B. J. Bushman, ‘Hot under the Collar in a Lukewarm Environment: Words Associated with Hot Temperature Increase Aggressive Thoughts and Hostile Perceptions’, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 2009.

Terrorism

70. F. M. Moghaddam, ‘The Staircase to Terrorism: A Psychological Exploration’, American Psychologist, 2005, 60, 161–9.

Part 8: Interpersonal Relations

Physical Attraction

71. J. H. Langlois, L. A. Roggman, and L. Musselman, ‘What is Average and what is Not Average about Attractive Faces?’, Psychological Science, 1994, 5, 214–20.

72. K. Dion, E. Berscheid, and E. Walster, ‘What is Beautiful is Good’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1972, 24, 285–90.

73. R. Thornhill and S. W. Gangestad, ‘The Scent of Symmetry: A Human Pheromone that Signals Fitness?’, Evolution and Human Behavior, 1999, 20, 175–201.

Similarity

74. S. Saegert, W. Swap, and R. Zajonc, ‘Exposure, Context and Interpersonal Attraction’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1973, 25, 234–42.

75. E. Berscheid et al., ‘Physical Attractiveness and Dating Choice: A Test of the Matching Hypothesis’, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 1971, 7, 173–89.

Implicit Attraction

76. A. J. Elliot and D. Niesta, ‘Romantic Red: Red Enhances Men’s Attraction to Women’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2008, 95, 1150–64.

77. K. C. Karremans et al., ‘Interacting with Women can Impair Men’s Cognitive Function’, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 2009.

Love and Relationships

78. L. Campbell et al., ‘Perceptions of Conflict and Support in Romantic Relationships: The Role of Attachment Anxiety’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2005, 88, 510–31.

79. C. E. Rusbult, ‘A Longitudinal Test of the Investment Model: The Development (and Deterioration) of Satisfaction and Commitment in Heterosexual Involvements’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1983, 45, 101–17.

80. R. E. Lucas, ‘Time Does Not Heal all Wounds: A Longitudinal Study of Reaction and Adaptation to Divorce’, Psychological Science, 2005, 16, 945–50.

Name: Social Psychology (Hardback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by Richard J. Crisp. Gordon W. Allport, one of social psychology’s founding fathers, described the subdiscipline as ‘an attempt to understand and explain how the thoughts, feelings and behavior of individuals are influenced by the actual, imagined or...
Categories: Social Psychology, Encyclopedias