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Volition, Rhetoric, and Emotion in the Work of Pascal

By Thomas Parker

Routledge – 2008 – 230 pages

Series: Studies in Philosophy

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    978-0-415-54253-1
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Description

This study identifies and analyzes a compelling theory and practice of persuasion that integrates the complexity of human desire. It demonstrates how the philosophical component in Pascal's description of the will makes a seamless integration into a vehicle of persuasion and poetics, providing a privileged viewpoint for understanding the author's complete works, arguing that the notion of will is of fundamental importance in Pascal's anthropology as well as in his rhetoric. This avenue of interpretation is both fruitful and difficult, because the word "volonte" means very different things in Pascal and in modern French. Beginning by contextualizing the notion of 'volonte' and explaining its expanded use in the seventeenth-century lexicon, the author then endeavors to show that Pascal borrows an essentially Augustinian paradigm of desire to create a depiction of the will divided against itself, surreptitiously yearning for what its bearer does not want.

Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Part One: Freedom and the Anatomy of the Will

Chapter One: The Will’s Expanded Lexicon and its Seventeenth-Century Context

Chapter Two: Early Modern Free Will

Part Two: The Will and Knowledge

Chapter Three: The Interior Regard of the Will

Chapter Four: The Will’s Effect on Knowledge

Chapter Five: The Rhetoric of Uncertainty

Part Three: Will, Wisdom, and Eloquence

Chapter Six: Nonrepresentational Truth, Wisdom and Justice

Conclusion

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Related Subjects

  1. Philosophy

Name: Volition, Rhetoric, and Emotion in the Work of Pascal (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: By Thomas Parker. This study identifies and analyzes a compelling theory and practice of persuasion that integrates the complexity of human desire. It demonstrates how the philosophical component in Pascal's description of the will makes a seamless integration...
Categories: Philosophy