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Christian Communities in the Middle East

Faith, Identity and Integration

By Fiona McCallum

Routledge – 2014 – 224 pages

Series: Routledge Studies in Religion and Politics

Purchasing Options:

  • Hardback: $130.00
    978-0-415-57120-3
    April 29th 2015
    Not yet available

Description

The Christian communities in the Middle East exist in an environment where religion has retained strong social significance but society is dominated by a different faith. This work explores the different historical processes of state building to examine regime policies towards the Christian presence in Syria and Jordan, identifying the methods used to accommodate groups with a distinct identity and integrate them into the nation state. This volume aims to give an overview of the under-studied Christian groups in this area, providing much-needed information on these minorities, assessing the implications of these policies on the two countries with reference to the question of regime legitimacy and determining if they can prove insightful for other regional governments in their efforts to integrate Middle Eastern Christian communities.

By examining different approaches such as secular nationalism, cultural pluralism, protected minority (dhimmi) and coercion, it would appear that there is a constant dilemma between attaining regime stability by promoting a national identity and allowing minority groups to retain their own identity. As indigenous communities, the case studies of the Christians of Syria and Jordan demonstrate to what extent the two regimes have successfully addressed this dilemma. The two countries offer interesting comparisons, and McCallum is able to highlight both the contrasting regimes and the similarities in the ongoing crises facing the region – economic problems, cultural change, the growth of political Islam and challenges posed by regional conflict. This new research will demonstrate that their role as interlocutors continues today and that their experience of living in this region has provided them with a rich knowledge and understanding of their coreligionist that is crucial to our understanding of Middle Eastern society.

Tackling issues central to the relationship between religion and politics including secularization, religious revival and the legal status of religions and their adherents, this work will be of great interest to all scholars of Religion, Comparative Politics and the Middle East.

Contents

1. Integration of Christians into the State 2. Christianity in Syria 3. Christianity in Jordan 4. Church State-Relations 5. Political and Religious Identity 6. Christian-Muslim Relations

Author Bio

Fiona McCallum is currently an RCUK fellow in Religon and Politics at the University of St.Andrews, and a Visiting Lecturer at the University of Stirling.

Name: Christian Communities in the Middle East: Faith, Identity and Integration (Hardback)Routledge 
Description: By Fiona McCallum. The Christian communities in the Middle East exist in an environment where religion has retained strong social significance but society is dominated by a different faith. This work explores the different historical processes of state building to examine...
Categories: Politics & International Relations, Middle East Studies, Middle East Politics, Religion, Religion, Comparative Politics, International Politics