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Roman Jakobson

Edited by Margaret Thomas

Routledge – 2014 – 1,858 pages

Series: Critical Assessments of Leading Linguists

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    March 24th 2014

Description

Although Roman Jakobson (1886–1982) styled himself a ‘Russian philologist’, that epithet covers only a fraction of his disciplinary breadth and international impact. In a long and prolific career, he wrote about theoretical and applied linguistics, phonology, prosody, poetics, semiotics, translation theory, psycholinguistics, language universals, literary history and criticism, and historical and descriptive linguistics, especially Slavic. His robust voice and distinctive ideas attracted attention not only from language scholars, but also from literary critics, anthropologists, historians of culture, and even from neurologists.

As serious work on Jakobson’s thinking and influence continues to flourish, this long-awaited new title in Routledge’s Critical Assessments of Leading Linguists series brings together the best analysis of—and commentary on—the work of one of the twentieth century’s most versatile and influential language scholars. Criticism of Jakobson is as diverse as the work itself and this four-volume set collects the most provocative and insightful reflections on Jakobson’s writings. It encompasses many points of view, reflecting Jakobson’s wide scope as a scholar and the startling fact that he was displaced repeatedly—and under threatening circumstances—from Moscow to Prague to the United States.

Roman Jakobson is fully indexed and includes a comprehensive introduction, newly written by the editor. It is an essential work of reference and is destined to be valued by scholars and students as a vital one-stop research and pedagogic resource.

Contents

Volume I

Part 1: Resources for Scholars

1. Bibliographies of Roman Jakobson’s Publications.

2. Festschriften and Memorial Volumes Created for Roman Jakobson.

3. Autobiographical Texts by Roman Jakobson.

4. Archival Resources for Research on the Work and Life of Roman Jakobson.

Part 2 Overviews of Jakobson’s Life and Work

5. Stephen Rudy, ‘Roman Jakobson: A Chronology’, in Henryk Baran, Sergej I. Gindin, Nikolai Grinzer, Tat’jana Nikolaeva, Stephen Rudy, and Elena Shumilova (eds.), Roman Jakobson: Texts, Documents, Studies (Moscow: Russian State University for the Humanities, 1999), pp. 83–103.

6. Henry Kučera, ‘Roman Jakobson’, Language, 1983, 59, 4, 871–83.

7. Linda R. Waugh and Monique Monville-Burston, ‘Introduction: The Life, Work, and Influence of Roman Jakobson’, in Linda R. Waugh and Monique Monville-Burston, (eds.), Roman Jakobson, On Language (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press), pp. 1–45.

8. Joseph Frank, ‘The Master Linguist’, New York Review of Books, 1984, 12, 29–33.

9. Krystyna Pomorska, ‘The Autobiography of a Scholar’, in Pomorska, Elżbieta Chodakowska, Hugh McLean, and Brent Vine (eds.), Language, Poetry, and Poetics: The Generation of the 1890s: Jakobson, Trubetzkoy, Majakovskij (Berlin: Mouton, 1987), pp. 3–13.

Part 3: Jakobson’s Milieu in Moscow

10. Victor Erlich, ‘Russian Formalism’, Journal of the History of Ideas, 1973, 34, 4, 627–38.

11. Herbert Eagle, ‘Afterword: Cubo-Futurism and Russian Formalism’, in Anna Lawton (ed.), Russian Futurism Through its Manifestoes, 1912–1928 (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1988), pp. 281–304.

12. Stephen Rudy, ‘Jakobson-Aljagrov and Futurism’, in Krystyna Pomorska, Elżbieta Chodakowska, Hugh McLean, and Brent Vine (eds.), Language, Poetry, and Poetics: The Generation of the 1890s: Jakobson, Trubetzkoy, Majakovskij (Berlin: Mouton, 1987), pp. 277–90.

Part 4: The Prague Linguistic Circle

13. Vilém Mathesius, ‘Ten Years of the Prague Linguistic Circle’ [1936], trans. Joseph Vachek, The Linguistic Circle of Prague: An Introduction to Its Theory and Practice (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1966), pp. 137–51.

14. Milada Součková, ‘The Prague Linguistic Circle: A Collage’, in Ladislav Matejka (ed.), Sound, Sign and Meaning: Quinquagenary of the Prague Linguistic Circle (Ann Arbor, MI: Michigan Slavic Contributions, 1976), pp. 1–6.

15. Jindřich Toman, ‘The Magic of a Common Language’, The Magic of a Common Language: Jakobson, Mathesius, Trubetzkoy, and the Prague Linguistic Circle (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1995), pp. 135–52.

16. Krystyna Pomorska, ‘The Drama of Science: Trubetzkoy’s Correspondence with Jakobson’, Jakobsonian Poetics and Slavic Narrative: From Pushkin to Solzhenitsyn (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1992), pp. 259–71.

17. Jindřich Toman, ‘Jakobson and Bohemia/Bohemia and the East’, in Françoise Gadet and Patrick Sériot (eds.), Jakobson entre l’est et l’ouest 1915–1939 (Lausanne: Université de Lausanne, 1997), pp. 237–47.

18. Bengt Jangfeldt, ‘Roman Jakobson in Sweden 1940–41’, Cahiers de l’ILSL (Institut de Linguistique et des Sciences du Langage), 1997, 9, 141–9.

Part 5: Jakobson’s Career in New York and Cambridge, Massachusetts

19. Jindřich Toman, ‘Epilogues’, The Magic of a Common Language: Jakobson, Mathesius, Trubetzkoy, and the Prague Linguistic Circle (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1995), pp. 243–61.

20. Stephen O. Murray, ‘European Structuralism in America’, Theory Groups and the Study of Language in North America: A Social History (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1994), pp. 215–19.

21. Morris Halle, ‘The Bloomfield–Jakobson Correspondence, 1944–1946’, Language, 1988, 64, 4, 737–54.

22. Harvey Pitkin, ‘Jakobson’s Contributions to American Linguistics’, in Daniel Armstrong and C. H. van Schooneveld (eds.), Roman Jakobson: Echoes of his Scholarship (Lisse: Peter de Ridder, 1977), pp. 357–62.

23. John E. Joseph, ‘How Structuralist was "American Structuralism"?’, From Whitney to Chomsky: Essays in the History of American Linguistics (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1999), pp. 157–67.

24. Stanislaw Pomorski, ‘Remembering Roman Osipovič Jakobson’, in Henryk Baran, Sergej I. Gindin, Nikolai Grinzer, Tat’jana Nikolaeva, Stephen Rudy, and Elena Shumilova (eds.), Roman Jakobson: Texts, Documents, Studies (Moscow: Russian State University for the Humanities, 1999), pp. 262–8.

25. Vyačeslav V. Ivanov, ‘Roman Jakobson: The future’, A Tribute to Roman Jakobson 1896–1982 (Berlin: Mouton, 1983), pp. 47–57.

26. Hugh McLean, ‘Roman Jakobson Repatriated’, Slavonica, 1996, 3, 2, 61–7.

Volume II

Part 1: Jakobson’s Work on Sound Structure, its Sources and Reception

27. Morris Halle, ‘Roman Jakobson’s Contribution to the Modern Study of Speech Sounds’, in Ladislav Matejka (ed.), Sound, Sign and Meaning: Quinquagenary of the Prague Linguistic Circle (Ann Arbor, MI: Michigan Slavic Contributions, 1976), pp. 79–100.

28. Pavle Ivić, ‘Roman Jakobson and the Growth of Phonology’ (review of Selected Writings I. Phonological Studies), Linguistics, 1965, 3, 18, 35–78.

29. Thomas A. Sebeok, review of Selected Writings I. Phonological Studies, Language, 1965, 41, 1, 77–88.

30. Noam Chomsky, review of Fundamentals of Language, International Journal of American Linguistics, 1957, 23, 3, 234–42.

31. Boris Gasparov, ‘Futurism and Phonology: Futurist Roots of Jakobson’s Approach to Language’, in Françoise Gadet and Patrick Sériot (eds.), Jakobson entre l’est et l’ouest 1915–1939 (Lausanne: Université de Lausanne, 1997), pp. 109–29.

32. L’ubomír Ďurovič, ‘The Ontology of the Phoneme in Early Prague Linguistic Circle’, in Françoise Gadet and Patrick Sériot (eds.), Jakobson entre l’est et l’ouest 1915–1939 (Lausanne: Université de Lausanne, 1997), pp. 69–76.

33. Gregory M. Eramian, ‘Some Notes on Trubetzkoy’s Abandonment of Disjunctive Oppositions’, Historiographia Linguistica, 1978, 5, 3, 275–88.

34. Juana Gil, ‘The Binarity Hypothesis in Phonology: 1938–1985’, Historiographia Linguistica, 1989, 16, 1/2, 61–88.

Part 2: Jakobsonian Distinctive Features

35. Morris Halle, ‘On the Origins of the Distinctive Features’, in Morris Halle (ed.), Roman Jakobson: What He Taught Us (Columbus, OH: Slavica, 1983), pp. 77–86.

36. Stephen R. Anderson, ‘Roman Jakobson and the Theory of Distinctive Features’, Phonology on the Twentieth Century: Theories of Rules and Theories of Representations (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985), pp. 116–39.

37. Yuen Ren Chao, review of Preliminaries to Speech Analysis: The Distinctive Features and Their Correlates, Romance Philology, 1954/5, 8, 40–6.

38. Paul L. Garvin, review of Preliminaries to Speech Analysis: The Distinctive Features and Their Correlates, Language, 1953, 29, 4, 472–81.

39. Robert A. Hall, review of Phonemic Analysis of the Word in Turinese, Symposium, 1950, 4, 2, 441–6.

40. E. Colin Cherry, ‘Jakobson’s "Distinctive Features" as the Normal Co-ordinates of a Language’, in Morris Halle, Horace G. Lunt, Hugh McLean, and Cornelis H. Van Schooneveld (eds.), For Roman Jakobson (The Hague: Mouton, 1956), pp. 60–4.

41. Robert D. Wilson, ‘A Criticism of Distinctive Features’, Journal of Linguistics, 1966, 2, 2, 195–206.

42. Peter Ladefoged, ‘Phonological Features and their Phonetic Correlates’, Journal of the International Phonetic Association, 1972, 2, 1, 2–12.

43. Gilbert Rappaport, ‘Distinctive and Redundant Contrasts in Jakobsonian Phonology: A Review Article’, The Slavic and East European Journal, 1981, 25, 3, 94–108.

44. Gunnar Fant, ‘Features: Fiction and Facts’, in Joseph S. Perkell and Dennis H. Klatt (eds.), Invariance and Variability in Speech Processes (Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 1986), pp. 480–8.

Part 3: Explorations and Assessments of Jakobson’s Work on Sound Structure

45. Martin Atkinson, ‘Jakobson’s Theory of Phonological Development’, Explanations in the Study of Child Language Development (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982), pp. 27–37.

46. Olga K. Garnica, ‘The Development of Phonemic Speech Perception’, in Timothy E. Moore (ed.), Cognitive Development and the Acquisition of Language (New York: Academic Press, 1973), pp. 215–22.

47. Charles A. Ferguson, ‘New Directions in Phonological Theory: Language Acquisition and Universals Research’, in Roger W. Cole (ed.), Current Issues in Linguistic Theory (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1977), pp. 256–70.

48. David Ingram, ‘Jakobson Revisited: Some Evidence from the Acquisition of Polish’, Lingua, 1988, 75, 1, 55–82.

49. Harry Walsh, ‘On Certain Practical Inadequacies of Distinctive Feature Systems’, Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1974, 39, 1, 32–43.

50. Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel and Dennis H. Klatt, ‘The Limited Use of Distinctive Features and Markedness in Speech Production: Evidence from Speech Error Data’, Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1979, 18, 1, 41–55.

51. Arby Ted Siraki, ‘Problems of a Linguistic Problem: On Roman Jakobson’s Coloured Vowels’, Neophilologus, 2009, 93, 1–9.

Part 4: Jakobson and Recent Developments in Phonology

52. Peter Ladefoged, ‘Phonetics and Phonology in the Last 50 Years’, UCLA Working Papers in Phonetics, 2004, 103, 1–11.

53. B. Elan Dresher, ‘The Contrastive Hierarchy in Phonology’, Toronto Working Papers in Linguistics, 2003, 20, 47–62.

54. Jeff Mielke, ‘General Arguments Against Innate Features’, The Emergence of Distinctive Features (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008), pp. 15–34.

55. G. N. Clements and P. A. Hallé, ‘"Phonetic Bases of Distinctive Features": Introduction’, Journal of Phonetics, 2010, 38, 3–9.

Volume III

Part 1: Overviews of Jakobson’s Research on Words and Grammars

56. Dennis Ward, review of Selected Writings, Vol. II. Word and Language, The Slavonic and East European Review, 1973, 51, 124, 452–9.

57. Robert H. Whitman, review of Selected Writings, I and II and Roman Jakobson: A Bibliography of His Writings, Language, 1973, 49, 3, 679–82.

58. Charles Lock, ‘Roman Jakobson and the Future of Linguistics’, Canadian Slavonic Papers, 1992, 34, 3, 311–18.

59. Edward Stankiewicz, ‘The Major Moments of Jakobson’s Linguistics’, in Krystyna Pomorska, Elżbieta Chodakowska, Hugh McLean, and Brent Vine (eds.), Language, Poetry, and Poetics: The Generation of the 1890s: Jakobson, Trubetzkoy, Majakovskij (Berlin: Mouton, 1987), pp. 81–94.

60. Linda R. Waugh, ‘Introduction’, in Waugh and Stephen Rudy (eds.), New Vistas in Grammar: Invariance and Variation (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1991), pp. 1–7.

Part 2: Commentary on Topics in Jakobsonian Linguistics

61. Edwin L. Battistella, ‘The Development of Markedness in Jakobson’s Work’, The Logic of Markedness (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996), pp. 19–34.

62. John E. Joseph, ‘A Certain Mark’, Limiting the Arbitrary: Linguistic Naturalism and its Opposites in Plato’s Cratylus and Modern Theory of Language (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1996), pp. 176–84.

63. Catherine V. Chvany, ‘The Evolution of the Concept of Markedness from the Prague Circle to Generative Grammar’, in Olga T. Yokoyama and Emily Klenin (eds.), The Selected Essays of Catherine V. Chvany (Columbus, OH: Slavica, 1996), pp. 234–41.

64. Catharine Diehl, ‘The Place of Zero in Structuralist Linguistics’ (excerpt from ‘The Empty Space in Structure: Theories of the Zero from Gauthiot to Deleuze’), Diacritics, 2008, 38, 3, 95–103.

65. Monika Fludernik, ‘Shifters and Deixis: Some Reflections on Jakobson, Jespersen, and Reference’, Semiotica, 1991, 86, 3/4, 193–230.

66. Olga T. Yokoyama, ‘Shifters and Non-Verbal Categories in Russian’, in Linda R. Waugh and Stephen Rudy (eds.), New Vistas in Grammar: Invariance and Variation (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1991), pp. 363–86.

67. Julia Kursell, ‘First Person Plural: Roman Jakobson’s Grammatical Fictions’, Studies in Eastern European Thought, 2010, 62, 217–36.

68. Elmar Holenstein, ‘The Functions of Language’, Roman Jakobson’s Approach to Language: Phenomenological Structuralism, trans. Catherine Schelbert and Tarcisius Schelbert (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1974), pp. 153–64.

69. John A. Hawkins, ‘Language Universals in Relation to Acquisition and Change: A Tribute to Roman Jakobson’, in Linda R. Waugh and Stephen Rudy (eds.), New Vistas in Grammar: Invariance and Variation (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1991), pp. 473–93.

Part 3: On Jakobson’s Research in Aphasia

70. Helene Uri, ‘Roman Jakobson’s Aphasia Model—Empirical Evidence from Four Norwegian Case Studies’, Scandinavian Journal of Logopedics and Phoniatrics, 1992, 17, 1, 137–43.

71. Guido Gainotti, Gabriele Miceli, and Carlo Caltagirone, ‘Contiguity Versus Similarity Paraphasic Substitutions in Broca’s and in Wernicke’s Aphasia’, Journal of Communication Disorders, 1981, 14, 1, 1–9.

72. Kees De Bot and Bert Weltens, ‘Recapitulation, Regression, and Language Loss’, in Herbert W. Seliger and Robert M. Vago (eds.), First Language Attrition (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991), pp. 31–51.

Part 4: Slavic Philology

73. Igor A. Mel’čuk, ‘Studies of the Russian Language’, in Morris Halle (ed.), Roman Jakobson: What He Taught Us (Columbus, OH: Slavica, 1983), pp. 57–71.

74. Rodney B. Sangster, ‘Morphology’, Roman Jakobson and Beyond: Language as a System of Signs (Berlin: Mouton, 1982), pp. 54–79.

75. Constantine Bida, ‘Linguistic Aspect of the Controversy Over the Authenticity of the Tale of Igor’s Campaign’, Canadian Slavonic Papers, 1956, 1, 76–88.

76. Charles J. Halperin, ‘"Authentic? Not Authentic? Not Authentic, Again!"’, Jahrbücher für Geschichte Osteuropas, 2006, 54, 4, 556–71.

Part 5: Jakobson and the History of Linguistics

77. Edward Stankiewicz, ‘Roman Jakobson’s Work on the History of Linguistics’, in Daniel Armstrong and C. H. van Schooneveld (eds.), Roman Jakobson: Echoes of His Scholarship (Lisse: Peter de Ridder, 1977), pp. 435–52.

78. Savina Raynaud, ‘The Critical Horizon of Jakobson’s Work and its Multidisciplinarity’, in Françoise Gadet and Patrick Sériot (eds.), Jakobson entre l’est et l’ouest 1915–1939 (Lausanne: Université de Lausanne, 1997), pp. 195–206.

79. Edna Andrews, ‘A Dialogue on the Sign: Can Peirce and Jakobson be Reconciled?’, Semiotica, 1990, 82, 1/2, 1–12.

80. Julia S. Falk, ‘Roman Jakobson and the History of Saussurean Concepts in North American Linguistics’, Historiographia Linguistica, 1995, 22, 3, 335–67.

81. E. F. K. Koerner, ‘Remarks on the Sources of Roman Jakobson’s Linguistic Inspiration’, Linguistic Historiography: Projects and Prospects (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1999), pp. 133–50.

82. František Čermák, ‘Synchrony and Diachrony Revisited: Was R. Jakobson and the Prague Circle Right in their Criticism of de Saussure?’, Folia Linguistica Historica, 1996, 17, 1/2, 29–40.

83. Roy Harris, ‘Jakobson’s Saussure’, Acta Linguistica Hafniensia, 1997, 29, 1, 75–88.

84. W. Keith Percival, ‘Roman Jakobson and the Birth of Linguistic Structuralism’, Sign Systems Studies, 2011, 39, 1, 236–62.

Volume IV

Part 1: Jakobson’s Poetics

85. R. D. B. Thomson, review of Selected Writings. Vol. V: On Verse, Its Masters and Explorers, The Slavonic and East European Review, 1981, 59, 2: 292–3.

86. R. D. B. Thomson, review of Selected Writing. Vol. III: The Poetry of Grammar and the Grammar of Poetry, The Slavonic and East European Review, 1983, 61, 4, 610–13.

87. Hugh McLean, ‘A Linguist Among Poets’, in Morris Halle (ed.), Roman Jakobson: What He Taught Us (Columbus, OH: Slavica, 1983), pp. 7–19.

88. Stephen Rudy, ‘Jakobson’s Inquiry into Verse and the Emergence of Structural Poetics’, in Ladislav Matejka (ed.), Sound, Sign and Meaning: Quinquagenary of the Prague Linguistic Circle (Ann Arbor, MI: Michigan Slavic Contributions, 1976), pp. 477–520.

89. Christian Kock, ‘The Function of Poetry in Our Lives: Roman Jakobson’s Legacy and Challenge to Poetics’, Acta Linguistica Hafniensia, 1997, 29, 1, 305–19.

90. Derek Attridge, ‘Closing Statement: Linguistics and Poetics in Retrospect’, in Nigel Fabb (ed.), The Linguistics of Writing: Arguments Between Language and Literature (New York: Methuen, 1987), pp. 15–32.

91. Michael Toolan, ‘What do Poets Show and Tell Linguists?’, Acta Linguistica Hafniensia, 2010, 42, S1, 189–204.

92. Paul Kiparsky, ‘Roman Jakobson and the Grammar of Poetry’, A Tribute to Roman Jakobson 1896–1982 (Berlin: Mouton, 1983), pp. 27–38.

Part 2: Assessments of Jakobsonian Poetics Applied to Specific Poems

93. Michael Riffaterre, ‘Describing Poetic Structures: Two Approaches to Baudelaire’s les Chats’, Yale French Studies, 1966, 36/37, 200–13.

94. Jonathan Culler, ‘Jakobson’s Poetic Analyses’, Structuralist Poetics: Structuralism, Linguistics and the Study of Literature (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1975), pp. 55–74.

95. Paul Werth, ‘Roman Jakobson’s Verbal Analysis of Poetry’, Journal of Linguistics, 1976, 12, 1, 21–42.

96. Richard D. Cureton, ‘Jakobson Revisited: Poetics, Subjectivity, and Temporality’, Journal of English Linguistics, 2000, 28, 4, 354–92.

97. Ilias Yocaris, ‘Towards a Neoformalist Approach to Literary Texts: Roman Jakobson’s Conceptual Heritage’, in Martin Procházka, Markéta Malá, and Pavlína Šaldová (eds.), The Prague School and Theories of Structure (Göttingen: V & R Unipress, 2010), pp. 261–80.

Part 3: Jakobson’s Role in the History of Poetics

98. Fernande M. Degeorge, ‘From Russian Formalism to French Structuralism’, Comparative Literature Studies, 1977, 14, 1, 20–9.

99. Richard Bradford, ‘Closing Section: Jakobson and Modernism’, Roman Jakobson: Life, Literature, Art (London: Routledge, 1994), pp. 180–99.

100. Galin Tihanov, ‘Why Did Modern Literary Theory Originate in Central and Eastern Europe? (And Why is it Now Dead?)’, Common Knowledge, 2004, 10, 1, 61–81.

Part 4: Jakobson’s Contributions to Folklore, Anthropology, and Semiotics

101. Lyubomira D. Parpulova, Charles E. Gribble, and James O. Bailey, ‘Roman Jakobson (1896–1982)’, The Journal of American Folklore, 1984, 97, 383, 57–60.

102. Charles D. Kaplan, ‘From Folklore to Folkstyle: The Prague School’s Contribution to the Ethnoinquiries’, in Yishai Tobin (ed.), The Prague School and Its Legacy in Linguistics, Literature, Semiotics, Folklore, and the Arts (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1988), pp. 227–44.

103. Steven C. Caton, ‘Jakobson’s Influence on Anthropology’ (excerpt from ‘Contributions of Roman Jakobson’), Annual Review of Anthropology, 1987, 16, 249–53.

104. Umberto Eco, ‘The Influence of Roman Jakobson on the Development of Semiotics’, in Daniel Armstrong and C. H. van Schooneveld (eds.), Roman Jakobson: Echoes of his Scholarship (Lisse: Peter de Ridder, 1977), pp. 39–58.

105. Joseph Graham, ‘Flip, Flap, Flop: Linguistics as Semiotics’, Diacritics, 1981, 11, 1, 29–43.

Part 5: Information Theory and Cybernetics in Jakobson’s Research

106. John Goldsmith, ‘On Information Theory, Entropy, and Phonology in the 20th Century’, Folia Linguistica, 2000, 34, 1/2, 85–100.

107. Jürgen Van de Walle, ‘Roman Jakobson, Cybernetics, and Information Theory: A Critical Assessment’, Folia Linguistica Historica, 2008, 29, 87–123.

108. Bernard Dionysius Geoghegan, ‘From Information Theory to French Theory: Jakobson, Lévi-Strauss, and the Cybernetic Apparatus’, Critical Inquiry, 2011, 38, 1, 96–126.

Author Bio

Edited and with a new introduction by Margaret Thomas, Professor of Linguistics in the Slavic and Eastern Languages and Literatures Department of Boston College, USA

Name: Roman Jakobson (Hardback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by Margaret Thomas. Although Roman Jakobson (1886–1982) styled himself a ‘Russian philologist’, that epithet covers only a fraction of his disciplinary breadth and international impact. In a long and prolific career, he wrote about theoretical...
Categories: Literary/Critical Theory, Applied Linguistics, Language & Linguistics, Historical Linguistics, Semiotics