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Controlling the Weapons of War

Politics, Persuasion, and the Prohibition of Inhumanity

By Brian Rappert

Routledge – 2006 – 240 pages

Series: Contemporary Security Studies

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    978-0-415-64701-4
    October 24th 2013
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    978-0-415-38667-8
    December 11th 2005

Description

A fresh examination of the ethical and intellectual issues and dilemmas associated with attempts to establish formal humanitarian limits on weaponry.

This new study considers how governments, non-governmental organizations, academics, political commentators and others have responded to the predicaments associated with imposing classifications about the relative acceptability of force and what is accomplished in their strategies for doing so. It develops these issues through combining thematic and conceptual analysis with the examination of varied cases of prohibitions on ‘conventional’ and ‘unconventional’ weapons through customary and statutory laws, multilateral treaties, UN resolutions, and national legislation.

The book will appeal to students of security studies, military technology, peace studies, international relations and discourse theory.

Contents

Part 1. This Happening World 1. The Chains that Bind? 2. Striving for Order 3. The Word and the World Part 2 1. The Technologies of Conflict and the Conflicts about Technology 2. Weapons: What are they? 3. Weapons: What are they for? 4. Weapons: What do they do? Part 3. Prohibiting Weapons 1. Predicaments with Prohibitions 2. Fractured Worlds: The Case of Cluster Bombs 3. Dealing with Unfinished Business Part 4. Future Agendas 1. Troubles with Humanitarian Prohibitions

Author Bio

Brian Rappert is Lecturer in the Department of Sociology, at the School of Historical, Political and Sociological Studies at Exeter University.

Name: Controlling the Weapons of War: Politics, Persuasion, and the Prohibition of Inhumanity (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: By Brian Rappert. A fresh examination of the ethical and intellectual issues and dilemmas associated with attempts to establish formal humanitarian limits on weaponry. This new study considers how governments, non-governmental organizations, academics, political...
Categories: Military Studies & Technology, Conflict Resolution, International Security