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Youth of Darkest England

Working-Class Children at the Heart of Victorian Empire

By Troy Boone

Routledge – 2005 – 256 pages

Series: Children's Literature and Culture

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $48.95
    978-0-415-65345-9
    January 10th 2013
  • Add to CartHardback: $150.00
    978-0-415-97262-8
    November 27th 2004

Description

This book examines the representation of English working-class children — the youthful inhabitants of the poor urban neighborhoods that a number of writers dubbed "darkest England" — in Victorian and Edwardian imperialist literature. In particular, Boone focuses on how the writings for and about youth undertook an ideological project to enlist working-class children into the British imperial enterprise, demonstrating convincingly that the British working-class youth resisted a nationalist identification process that tended to eradicate or obfuscate class differences.

Contents

Series Editor’s Foreword Awknowledgments List of Illustrations Introduction 1. Henry Mayhew’s Children of the Street 2. Class, Violence, and Mid-Victorian Penny Fiction: "Murder Made Familiar"? 3. Improving Penny Fiction: The "Ticklish Work" of Treasure Island 4. Remaking Lawless Lads and Liscentious Girls: The Salvation Army and the Regeneration of Empire 5. The Boy Scouts and the Working Classes 6. Patriot Games: Football and the First World War Notes Bibliography IndexBottom of Form 7

Author Bio

Troy M. Boone is Assistant Professor of English and Acting Director of the Children's Literature Program at the University of Pittsburgh, US.

Name: Youth of Darkest England: Working-Class Children at the Heart of Victorian Empire (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: By Troy Boone. This book examines the representation of English working-class children — the youthful inhabitants of the poor urban neighborhoods that a number of writers dubbed "darkest England" — in Victorian and Edwardian imperialist...
Categories: Literature, Children's Literature, British Literature