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Family Investments in Children's Potential

Resources and Parenting Behaviors That Promote Success

Edited by Ariel Kalil, Thomas DeLeire

Psychology Press – 2004 – 316 pages

Series: Monographs in Parenting Series

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  • Add to CartPaperback: $49.95
    978-0-415-65482-1
    May 3rd 2013
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    978-0-8058-4871-7
    June 2nd 2004

Description

The papers in this volume bring together a cross-disciplinary mix of researchers--developmental psychologists, evolutionary biologists, economists, anthropologists, and sociologists--working on the common theme of investments in children. The interdisciplinary conceptual framework adopted by this collection of papers is loosely built around the idea that there are two broad dimensions of parental investments. These include resources (e.g., income, wealth) on the one hand, and behaviors (e.g., parental instrumental support and parental activities that promote warmth, socialization, and cognitive stimulation) on the other. Believing that parental investments yield a "return" in improved child and young adult outcomes, the papers discuss how parents differ in terms of the resources they have available to invest, the choices parents make, the behaviors they engage in, and relevant policy and program interventions.

More specifically, core questions addressed by the authors include: Why do some families invest while others do not and are differential investment patterns related to biology, economics, or social factors? What constitutes a successful "investment portfolio?" How are "investments" measured and/or characterized? Are different investments interchangeable, compensating, or off-setting? Given a set of resources, why are some families able to make more effective investments in child outcomes? How well do these investments affect outcomes for children and for these children as young adults? Can interventions or public policies help families build assets or become "better" investors in their children's potential? Developing a better understanding of what investments matter, when they matter, and how resources can be successfully invested in children's potential is key to shaping efficient interventions and social policies. Knowledge of how parents invest and what strategies are effective may help policies which seek to further empower and enable parental involvement and choice for their children.

Reviews

"This collection would make valuable reading for those involved in policy making with regard to children's services, as well as workers in the field."

Australian Institute of Family Studies

Contents

Contents: M.H. Bornstein, Series Foreword: Monographs in Parenting. Preface. R.H. Bradley, R.F. Corwyn, "Family Process" Investments That Matter for Child Well-Being. J.M. Neiderhiser, D. Reiss, Family Investment and Child and Adolescent Adjustment: The Role of Genetic Research. R.T. Michael, Family Influences on Children's Verbal Ability. R. Dunifon, G.J. Duncan, J. Brooks-Gunn, The Long-Term Impact of Parental Organization and Efficiency. M.J. Guralnick, Family Investments in Response to the Developmental Challenges of Young Children With Disabilities. A.J. Fuligni, H. Yoshikawa, Investments in Children Among Immigrant Families. S. Lundberg, E. Rose, Investments in Sons and Daughters: Evidence From the Consumer Expenditure Survey. K.M. Ziol-Guest, A. Kalil, T. DeLeire, Expenditure Decisions in Single-Parent Households. K.A. Magnuson, G.J. Duncan, Parent Versus Child-Based Intervention Strategies for Promoting Children's Well-Being. J. Waldfogel, A Cross-National Perspective on Policies to Promote Investments in Children.

Name: Family Investments in Children's Potential: Resources and Parenting Behaviors That Promote Success (Paperback)Psychology Press 
Description: Edited by Ariel Kalil, Thomas DeLeire. The papers in this volume bring together a cross-disciplinary mix of researchers--developmental psychologists, evolutionary biologists, economists, anthropologists, and sociologists--working on the common theme of investments in children. The...
Categories: Child Development, Parenting and Families, Family Policy