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Love

By Tom Inglis

Routledge – 2013 – 134 pages

Series: Shortcuts

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $19.95
    978-0-415-69612-8
    March 1st 2013
  • Add to CartHardback: $104.00
    978-0-415-69611-1
    February 28th 2013

Description

Love is a dominant theme in Western popular culture. It has become central to the meaning of everyday life, propagated through the media and the market. Being in love has become idealised. With the demise of institutional religion in the West, romantic love has become the dominant form of inner-worldly salvation. In Foucault’s terms, it has become a key component in the ‘arts of existence’ and the care of self.

In this highly accessible introduction to love of all kinds, Tom Inglis gives a clear, concise picture of how love shapes, and is shaped by, society. How is romantic love linked to capitalism? What is the difference between romantic love and loving? How is love connected to separation, loss and grief? Inglis addresses all these questions, and looks at how today’s changing circumstances – globalisation, mobile lives and a new rugged individualism – have changed our perceptions of love and relationships.

Love is an engaging, thoughtful introduction to the subject for students, academics and general readers alike.

Contents

Series editor’s preface 1. Love Makes the World Go Round 2. Romantic Love 3. All Kinds of Loving 4. Ingredients of Love 5. An Emotional Game 6. Being Lovely 7. Love and Sex 8. Making Love 9. Separation, Loss and Grief 10. Conclusion. Notes. Glossary. Suggested Further Reading

Author Bio

Tom Inglisis Associate Professor of Sociology in University College Dublin. He has written extensively on religion, sexuality, globalization, the media and love, particularly in his books Moral Monopoly (second edition, 1998), Lessons in Irish Sexuality (1998), Truth, Power and Lies (2003), Global Ireland (2008) and Making Love (2012).

Name: Love (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: By Tom Inglis. Love is a dominant theme in Western popular culture. It has become central to the meaning of everyday life, propagated through the media and the market. Being in love has become idealised. With the demise of institutional religion in the West, romantic...
Categories: Sociology & Social Policy, Sociology of Culture, Social Psychology, Contemporary Social Theory, Cultural Studies