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A History of Police and Masculinities, 1700–2010

Edited by David G. Barrie, Susan Broomhall

Routledge – 2012 – 308 pages

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    978-0-415-69661-6
    December 15th 2011
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    978-0-415-67129-3
    December 15th 2011

Description

This unique collection brings together leading international scholars to explore how ideologies about masculinities have shaped police culture, policy and institutional organization from the eighteenth century to the present day.

It addresses an under-researched area of historical inquiry, providing the first in-depth study of how gender ideologies have shaped law enforcement and civic governance under ‘old’ and ‘new’ police models, tracing links, continuities, and changes between them. The book opens up scholarly understanding of the ways in which policing reflected, sustained, embodied and enforced ideas of masculinities in historic and modern contexts, as well as how conceptions of masculinities were, and continue to be, interpreted through representations of the police in various forms of print and popular culture.

The research covers the UK, Europe, Australia and America and explores police typologies in different international and institutional contexts, using varied approaches, sources and interpretive frameworks drawn from historical and criminological traditions.

This book will be essential reading for academics, students and those in interested in gender, culture, police and criminal justice history as well as police practitioners.

Reviews

"This interesting anthology traces changing notions of masculinity in various police agencies in recent history….the work is the best quarry about police sources this reviewer has seen in recent years. Summing up: Highly Recommended." - P.T. Smith, CHOICE, October 2012

"This edited collection on how masculine ideologies have shaped, and were shaped by, policing both culturally and institutionally, is a joy to read … As the study of masculinities slowly makes inroads into areas of history heretofore viewed with either a traditional political focus or, more recently, a specifically female-orienated approach, a collection such A History of Police and Masculinities, 1700–2010 is a welcome addition to gender scholarship." - Deborah Seiler, Otto-Friedrich University, Germany in Parergon

Contents

Introduction, David G. Barrie and Susan Broomhall 1. The Paternal Government of Men: The Self-Image and Action of the Paris Police in the Eighteenth Century? David Garrioch 2. 'A Species of Civil Soldier': Masculinity, Policing and Military in 1780s England, Matthew McCormack 3. Making Men: Media, Magistrates and the Representation of Masculinity in Scottish Police Courts, 1800-1835, Susan Broomhall and David G. Barrie 4. Becoming Policemen in Nineteenth-Century Italy: Police Gender Culture Through the Lens of Professional Manuals, Simona Mori 5. Men on a Mission: Masculinity, Violence and the Self-Presentation of Policemen in England c.1870-1914, Francis Dodsworth 6. Shedding the Uniform and Acquiring a New Masculine Image: The Case of the Late Victorian and Edwardian English Police Detective, Haia Shpayer-Makov 7. 'Well-set up men': Respectable Masculinity and Police Organizational Culture in Melbourne 1853–c.1920, Dean Wilson 8. Of Tabloids and Gentlemen: How Depictions of Policing helped Define American Masculinities at the Turn of the Twentieth Century, Guy Reel 9. Quiet and Determined Servants and Guardians: Creating Ideal English Police Officers, 1900–1945, Joanne Klein 10. Science and Surveillance: Masculinity and the New York State Police, 1945–1980 Gerda W. Ray 11. Managerial Masculinity: An Insight into the Twenty-First-Century Police Leader, Marisa Silvestri

Author Bio

David G. Barrie is lecturer in British history at The University of Western Australia. His research interests include crime and punishment in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Scotland. He is author of Police in the Age of Improvement: Police Development and the Civic Tradition in Scotland, 1775-1865 (Willan Publishing, 2008), which was awarded ‘best first book’ in Scottish history by the international committee of the Frank Watson Book Prize. He has published widely on Scottish policing in leading international journals.

Susan Broomhall is Winthrop Professor in history at The University of Western Australia. Her research focuses on early modern gender history. Most recently she is editor (with Jaqueline Van Ghent) of Governing Masculinities in the Early Modern Period: Regulating Selves and Others (Ashgate, 2011) and author (with Jennifer Spinks) of Early Modern Women in the Low Countries: Feminising Sources and Interpretations of the Past (Ashgate, 2011).

Name: A History of Police and Masculinities, 1700–2010 (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by David G. Barrie, Susan Broomhall. This unique collection brings together leading international scholars to explore how ideologies about masculinities have shaped police culture, policy and institutional organization from the eighteenth century to the present day. It addresses an...
Categories: Criminology and Criminal Justice, Police, Legal History, Criminal Justice History, World/International History, Women's & Gender History