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Explaining Inequality

By Maurizio Franzini, Mario Pianta

Routledge – 2015 – 224 pages

Purchasing Options:

  • Paperback: $49.95
    978-0-415-70348-2
    July 27th 2015
    Not yet available
  • Hardback: $170.00
    978-0-415-70349-9
    July 28th 2015
    Not yet available

Description

Inequality within advanced countries has returned to levels typical of a century ago. At the global level it remains extremely high despite the rapid growth of major developing countries such as China, India and Brazil. This makes inequality a major economic issue and a major social problem and political challenge as recognised by two recent OECD Reports.

However, until now, economic inequality has been the object of limited research efforts and attracts modest attention in the political arena; despite important advances in the knowledge of its dimensions, a convincing understanding of the mechanisms at its roots is still lacking.

This book provides a concise yet comprehensive overview of the economics of inequality. The authors present the evidence, an investigation of the main mechanisms leading to increasing disparities and arguments for appropriate policy actions.

Contents

Introduction: Inequality Matters 1. Explaining Inequality 2. Market Outcomes: Income Distribution, Finance, Technology and Labour Markets 3. Family Matters: Human Capital and Intergenerational Inequality 4. State (In) action: Redistribution and Welfare Policies 5. Conclusions: New Policies on Inequality

Author Bio

Maurizio Franzini is Professor of Political Economy at the University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Italy

Mario Pianta is Full Professor of Economic Policy at the University of Urbino “Carlo

Bo”, Italy.

Name: Explaining Inequality (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: By Maurizio Franzini, Mario Pianta. Inequality within advanced countries has returned to levels typical of a century ago. At the global level it remains extremely high despite the rapid growth of major developing countries such as China, India and Brazil. This makes inequality a major...
Categories: Political Economy, History of Economic Thought, Philosophy of Social Science, Economic Theory & Philosophy, Philosophy of Science