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Museum Informatics

People, Information, and Technology in Museums

By Paul F. Marty, Katherine Burton Jones

Routledge – 2007 – 356 pages

Series: Routledge Studies in Library and Information Science

Purchasing Options:

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    978-0-415-80218-5
    January 7th 2009
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    978-0-8247-2581-5
    September 7th 2007

Description

Museum Informatics explores the sociotechnical issues that arise when people, information, and technology interact in museums. It is designed specifically to address the many challenges faced by museums, museum professionals, and museum visitors in the information society. It examines not only applications of new technologies in museums, but how advances in information science and technology have changed the very nature of museums, both what it is to work in one, and what it is to visit one.

To explore these issues, Museum Informatics offers a selection of contributed chapters, written by leading museum researchers and practitioners, each covering significant themes or concepts fundamental to the study of museum informatics and providing practical examples and detailed case studies useful for museum researchers and professionals. In this way, Museum Informatics offers a fresh perspective on the sociotechnical interactions that occur between people, information, and technology in museums, presented in a format accessible to multiple audiences, including researchers, students, museum professionals, and museum visitors.

Contents

Contents

Figures, Charts, and Tables

Preface

Section 1 Introductions

Chapter 1 An Introduction to Museum Informatics

Paul F. Marty, Florida State University

Chapter 2 The Transformation of the Digital Museum

Katherine Burton Jones, Harvard Divinity School

Section 2 Information Resources in Museums

Chapter 3 Information Representation

Paul F. Marty, Florida State University

Chapter 4 Representing Museum Knowledge

David Bearman, Archives and Museum Informatics

Chapter 5 The Information Revolution in Museums

Darren Peacock, University of South Australia

Section 3 Information Management in Museums

Chapter 6 Information Organization and Access

Paul F. Marty, Florida State University

Chapter 7 Information Policy in Museums

Diane Zorich, Information Management Consultant for Cultural Organizations

Chapter 8 Metadata and Museum Information

Murtha Baca, Erin Coburn, and Sally Hubbard, J. Paul Getty Trust

Section 4 Information Interactions in Museums

Chapter 9 Interactive Technologies

Paul F. Marty, Florida State University

Chapter 10 A World of Interactive Exhibits

Maria Economou, University of the Aegean

Museum Informatics

Chapter 11 Blurring Boundaries for Museum Visitors

Areti Galani, University of Newcastle

Matthew Chalmers, University of Glasgow

Section 5 Information Behavior in Museums

Chapter 12 Changing Needs and Expectations

Paul F. Marty, Florida State University

Chapter 13 Understanding the Motivations of Museum Audiences

Kirsten Ellenbogen, Science Museum of Minnesota

John Falk and Kate Haley Goldman, Institute for Learning Innovation

Chapter 14 Partnerships for Progress: Electronic Access and Museum Resources in the

Classroom

Jim Devine, Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery, University of Glasgow

Section 6 Information Collaborations in Museums

Chapter 15 Collections and Consortia

Paul F. Marty, Florida State University

Chapter 16 AMOL Ten Years On: A Legacy of Working Beyond Museum Walls

Basil Dewhurst and Kevin Sumption, Powerhouse Museum

Chapter 17 Challenges to Museum Collaboration: The MOAC Case Study

Richard Rinehart, UC Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive

Layna White, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Section 7 Conclusions

Chapter 18 Information Professionals in Museums

Paul F. Marty, Florida State University

Chapter 19 Curating Collections Knowledge: Museums on the Cyberinfrastructure

Jennifer Trant, Archives and Museum Informatics

Chapter 20 The Future of Museums in the Information Age

Maxwell L. Anderson, Indianapolis Museum of Art

About the Authors

References

Index

Author Bio

Paul F. Marty is Assistant Professor in the College of Information at Florida State University. He has a background in ancient history and computer science engineering, and his Ph.D. is from the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Katherine Burton Jones is the Assistant Dean for Information Technology and Media Services at the Harvard Divinity School. She is the Research Advisor and an instructor for the Masters in Liberal Arts in Museum Studies. She is a former President of the Board of Directors of the Museum Computer Network.

Name: Museum Informatics: People, Information, and Technology in Museums (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: By Paul F. Marty, Katherine Burton Jones. Museum Informatics explores the sociotechnical issues that arise when people, information, and technology interact in museums. It is designed specifically to address the many challenges faced by museums, museum professionals, and museum visitors in the...
Categories: Major Works, American Studies, Issues, Museum Studies