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Jay Haley Revisited

Edited by Madeleine Richeport-Haley, Jon Carlson

Routledge – 2010 – 534 pages

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $48.95
    978-0-415-80533-9
    February 22nd 2010
  • Add to CartHardback: $140.00
    978-0-415-80531-5
    February 22nd 2010

Description

Jay Haley Revisited brings together influential professionals in psychotherapy and counseling to introduce, analyze, and put into context 20 of the most interesting and significant papers Jay Haley produced, both published and unpublished. Jay Haley was one of the most influential thinkers in psychotherapy who revolutionized the field through his writings, teachings, research, and supervision for more than half a century. The seminal classic papers found in this volume capture the wit, humor, and the ability to look at a field and offer critique that leads to constructive change. This book will delight readers who, in one volume, can trace the birth and development of the field of family therapy, and the revolution from traditional ideas to modern therapy approaches, in the voice of one of the field’s most gifted teachers.

Reviews

"In 1973 in his book Uncommon Therapy Jay Haley introduced Milton Erickson to the world. It was not long after that Jay Haley himself was acknowledged an uncommon therapist. A leader in family therapy and strategic interventions, psychotherapy would not be where it is today without his bold innovations and his audacious personality. His astounding legacy is extensively and engagingly portrayed in this volume by those who knew him best." - Nicholas A. Cummings, PhD, ScD, Former President, American Psychological Association; Distinguished Professor, University of Nevada, Reno; President, Cummings Foundation for Behavioral Health

"Rereading Jay Haley years later has rekindled my sense of admiration and pleasure. The fact that each of the 20 articles is introduced by a scholarly clinician adds to the experience, highlighting the pointed wit, the elegance of the writing, and the wisdom of the master. Read, enjoy, and think anew." - Salvador Minuchin, MD, Former Director, Philadelphia Child Guidance Clinic

"The works and words of Jay Haley are worth visiting again and again; how exciting and powerful to have his most significant papers in our own hands." - Pat Love, EdD, author, The Truth About Love

"Jay Haley has always been one of my heroes. Our great loss with his death is now softened by this amazing publication of his papers. The master speaks to us again and his profundity is gracefully accompanied by prominent guides who have organized this valuable material. I can’t wait to use this book in my own teaching." - John Gottman, PhD, co-founder, The Gottman Institute

"This is an interesting and enjoyable text for therapists who want to understand better the history of the golden age of family therapy and for those who enjoy a nostalgic walk through the evolution of our own consciousness and development and therapists. The writing is both strong and pleasurable. I strongly recommend this book to those in my cohort who were around during the heyday of family therapy in the 1970s." - Jerrold Lee Shapiro in PsycCRITIQUES, October 2010, Vol. 55

"I was pleased to see that each paper is introduced by a different colleague from the related fields of psychology, psychiatry, social psychology, marital and family therapy or counselling academics/teachers/lecturers. These introductions are really useful and insightful. It would be really useful for trainee family therapists, especially those interested in experimental techniques and Haley's unconventional approach." - Bella Hewes, MBACP, in The Independent Practitioner

Contents

Richeport-Haley, Carlson, Jay Haley: An Introduction. Elkaim, "The Art of Psychoanalysis." Montalvo, "The Art of Being Schizophrenic." Hoyt, "An Ordeal for Pleasure: A Story." Sperry, "The Art of Being a Failure as a Therapist." Weiner-Davis, "How to Have an Awful Marriage." O'Hanlon, "How to Criticize Your Fellow Therapists." Nichols, "Fourteen Ways to Fail as a Teacher of Family Therapy." Grove, "Why a Mental Health Clinic Should Avoid Family Therapy." Hardy, "A Quiz for Young Therapists." Greenberg, "How to Be a Marriage Therapist Without Knowing Practically Anything." Mazza, "On the Right to Choose One's Own Grandchildren." Doherty, "Sex and Power in Marriage." Mazza, "How Should a Gentleman Talk to a Feminist Family Therapist?" Yapko, "How to Be a Therapy Supervisor Without Knowing How to Change Anyone." Zeig, "The Brief Brief Therapy of Milton H. Erickson." Burns, "Zen and the Art of Therapy." Lebow, "Ideas That Have Handicapped Therapists." Sluzki, "Development of a Theory: A History of a Research Project." Wubbolding, "The Effect of Long-Term Outcome Studies on the Therapy of Schizophrenia." Schiff, "The Loyal Opposition."

*All titles in quotes represent original articles written by Jay Haley, with an introduction by each contributor.

Name: Jay Haley Revisited (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by Madeleine Richeport-Haley, Jon Carlson. Jay Haley Revisited brings together influential professionals in psychotherapy and counseling to introduce, analyze, and put into context 20 of the most interesting and significant papers Jay Haley produced, both published and unpublished. Jay Haley was...
Categories: Professional Issues & Professional Development, Family Therapy, Marriage & Family Counseling