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Evolution of Government Policy Towards Homosexuality in the US Military

The Rise and Fall of DADT

Edited by James E. Parco, David A. Levy

Routledge – 2014 – 428 pages

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  • Add to CartHardback: $150.00
    978-0-415-81603-8
    October 1st 2013

Description

Throughout history, homosexuality has been a complicating factor for men and women electing to serve in the armed forces of the United States. The right to serve became increasingly complicated when the Department of Defense responded to congressional legislation in 1993 by adopting a policy that later became known as "don’t ask, don’t tell" (DADT). DADT permitted homosexual members to serve in the forces, so long as they showed no evidence of homosexual behavior. The compromise policy remained in force until Congress passed the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Repeal Act of 2010 and finally, in September 2011, the ban on gay men and lesbians serving openly in the US armed forces officially came to an end. Reflecting on the 20-year period governed by DADT, this volume explores the history, culture, attitudes and impacts of policy evolution from the mid-20th Century through to the present day. It not only provides insight to the scholarly field of how the most powerful institution in the world has viewed and dealt with homosexuality as it transitioned into the 21st century, but it is also poised to become a seminal collection for researchers in the decades to come.

This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Homosexuality.

"Parco and Levy have produced a fine edited volume dedicated to deepening our understanding of the federal DADT policy. What has resulted is a deep analysis of the federal policies regarding gays and lesbians in the U.S. military. This volume is filled with rich descriptions and analyses written by the very best thinkers about issues pertaining to gays and lesbians in the U.S. military. Parco and Levy not only offer a comprehensive treatment of DADT, but their book will stand the test of time and spur additional important research about gay, lesbian, bisexual, and queer service members. The Rise and Fall of DADT is accessibly written and offers readers a comprehensive understanding of the DADT federal policy and the attendant issues of equity, social justice and ever-changing attitudes about LGBTQ people related to the U.S. military and to the larger American society."

John P. Elia, Ph.D. Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Homosexuality and Professor and Associate Chair of Health Education at San Francisco State University, USA

"As Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs from 2010 to 2012, and the first openly-gay senior official to serve at the Pentagon, I was witness to and honored to be an active participant in the historic process that led to the ban on discrimination against lesbian and gay service members: men and women who had been hiding in plain sight while risking their lives to serve their country honorably. In this volume, Jim Parco and Dave Levy provide what is perhaps the most comprehensive account to date of the evolution of US government policy regarding LGBT service members. Their study includes outstanding firsthand narratives by many friends who played central roles in the repeal of Don’t Ask/Don’t tell, including Sue Fulton, Jonathan Lee and former Congressman Patrick Murphy. Parco and Levy provide the opportunity for scholars, experts and ordinary citizens from all walks of life to share in those journeys and in the very positive results that were achieved."

Douglas B. Wilson, former Assistant Secretary of Defense for the United States

Contents

Preface James E. Parco and David A. Levy Foreword: The Political Battle for Repeal: Personal Reflections from the Frontlines Patrick Murphy; Section I: Agents for Change 1: The President’s Pleasant Surprise: How LGBT Advocates Ended "Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell" Nathaniel Frank 2: Politics of Paranoia Aaron Belkin 3: OutServe: An Underground Network Stands Up Sue Fulton 4: The Rise of Repeal: Policy Entrepreneurship and "Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell" Christopher Neff and Luke Edgell Section II: Policy Evolution 5: From Exclusion to Acceptance: A Case History of Homosexuality in the US Court of Military Appeals Kellie Wilson-Buford 6: Formalizing the Ban: My Experience in the Reagan Administration Larry Korb and Alex Rothman 7: The Comprehensive Review Working Group and DADT Repeal at the Department of Defense in 2010 Jonathan Lee 8: Outing the Costs of Civil Deference to the Military Elizabeth Hillman 9: Gays in the U.S. Military: Reviewing the Research and Conceptualizing A Way Forward Armando X. Estrada, Gia A.DiRosa and Arwen H. DeConstanza Section III: Organizational Implications 10: Policy and Paradox: Grounded Theory at the Moment of DADT Repeal James E. Parco and David A. Levy 11: The Myth of the Warrior: Martial Masculinity and the End of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell L. Michael Allsep 12: If We Ask, What They Might Tell: Clinical Assessment Lessons from LGBT Military Personnel Post-DADT Heliana Ramirez, Stephen J. Rogers, Harriet L. Johnson, Jon Banks, Wanda P. Seay, Billy L. Tinsley and Andrew W. Grant 13: Mental Health Characteristics of Sexual Minority Veterans Bryan N. Cochran, Kimberly Balsam, Annesa Flentje, Carol A. Malte and Tracy Simpson 14: Transgender People in the Military: Don’t Ask? Don’t Tell? Don’t Enlist! Adam F. Yerke and Valory Mitchell 15. One Year Out: An Assessment of DADT Repeal’s Impact on Military Readiness Aaron Belkin, Morten Ender, Nathaniel Frank, Stacie Furia, Gary Packard, Tammy S. Schultz, Steven Samuels and David R. Segal; Appendices Appendix I: Title 10, Section 654 of the United States Code. "Policy Concerning Homosexuality in the Armed Forces" (1993); Appendix II: Executive Summary, Report of the Comprehensive Review of the Issues Associated with a Repeal of DADT; Appendix III: H.R.6520 – Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010

Author Bio

Jim Parco is an Associate Professor of Economics and Business at Colorado College, USA. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Arizona and an MBA from the College of William & Mary. He previously taught at the Air Command & Staff College, USA, and at the US Air Force Academy. He retired from active-duty in 2011. He has co-authored The 52nd Floor: Thinking Deeply about Leadership, Attitudes Aren’t Free: Thinking Deeply about Diversity in the U.S. Armed Forces and Echoes of Mind: Thinking Deeply about Humanship.

Dave Levy is a Professor of Management at the US Air Force Academy. He served on active-duty from 1988-1998 and received his Ph.D. in organizational behavior from Cornell University, USA. He has co-authored The 52nd Floor: Thinking Deeply about Leadership, Attitudes Aren’t Free: Thinking Deeply about Diversity in the U.S. Armed Forces and Echoes of Mind: Thinking Deeply about Humanship.

Name: Evolution of Government Policy Towards Homosexuality in the US Military: The Rise and Fall of DADT (Hardback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by James E. Parco, David A. Levy. Throughout history, homosexuality has been a complicating factor for men and women electing to serve in the armed forces of the United States. The right to serve became increasingly complicated when the Department of Defense responded to congressional...
Categories: Military Studies, Gay & Lesbian, Military Sociology, U.S. Military History