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Rationality and Moral Theory

How Intimacy Generates Reasons

By Diane Jeske

Routledge – 2009 – 180 pages

Series: Routledge Studies in Ethics and Moral Theory

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $54.95
    978-0-415-88786-1
    November 3rd 2010
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    978-0-415-99036-3
    June 24th 2008

Description

This book provides answers to both normative and metaethical questions in a way that shows the interconnection of both types of questions, and also shows how a complete theory of reasons can be developed by moving back and forth between the two types of questions. It offers an account of the nature of intimate relationships and of the nature of the reasons that intimacy provides, and then uses that account to defend a traditional intuitionist metaethics. The book thus combines attention to the details of the lived moral life – the context in which many of our most pressing moral questions arise, how we deliberate and make moral decisions, the complexities that plague our attempts to know what we ought to do – with theoretical rigor in offering an account of the nature of reasons, how we come to have moral knowledge, and how we can adjudicate between competing positions.

Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction: Agents and Their ReasonsSituating the Project

How Not to Understand Reasons of Intimacy

Friends and Other RelationsIntimacy, Fidelity, and Commitments

Friendship and Particularism

Deontological Constraints and Dispute ResolutionThe Scope of the Objective Agent-Relative

Author Bio

Diane Jeske received her PhD from MIT, and is now an associate professor of philosophy at The University of Iowa. She has published extensively on special obligations to intimates and is co-editor, with Richard Fumerton, of Philosophy Through Film.

Name: Rationality and Moral Theory: How Intimacy Generates Reasons (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: By Diane Jeske. This book provides answers to both normative and metaethical questions in a way that shows the interconnection of both types of questions, and also shows how a complete theory of reasons can be developed by moving back and forth between the two types of...
Categories: Moral Theory, Ethics Philosophy, Philosophy of Human Nature