Skip to Content

Cyberpop

Digital Lifestyles and Commodity Culture

By Sidney Eve Matrix

Routledge – 2013 – 200 pages

Series: Routledge Studies in New Media and Cyberculture

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $49.95
    978-0-415-64901-8
    July 27th 2012
  • Add to CartHardback: $140.00
    978-0-415-97677-0
    May 22nd 2006

Description

Cyberpop is an analysis of cyberculture and its popular cultural productions. The study begins with a Foucaultian model of cyberculture as a discursive formation, and explains how some key concepts (such as 'virtuality,' 'speed,' and 'Connectivity') operate as a conceptual architecture network linking technologies to information and individual subjects. The chapters then each focus on a particular cyberfiguration, including Hollywood films (GATTACA, The Matrix), popular literature (William Gibson's Neuromancer, Scott Westerfeld's Polymorph), advertising for digital products and services (Apple Computer's '1984/McIntosh' campaign, AT&T's 'mLife' campaign), digital artworks (including virtual females such as Motorola's 'Mya' and Elite Modeling Agency's 'Webbie Tookay,' and work by visual artist Daniel Lee for Microsoft's 'Evolution' campaign), and video games (Tomb Raider). Each close reading illustrates the ways in which representations of digital lifestyles and identities - which typically fetishize computers and celebrate a 'high tech' aesthetic encourage participation in digital capitalism and commodity cyberculture. Matrix argues that popular representations of cyberculture often function as forms of social criticism that creatively inspire audiences to 'think different' (in the words of Mac advertising) about the consequences of the digitalization of everyday life.

Author Bio

Sidney Eve Matrix (Ph.D. University of Minnesota, 2003) is Assistant Professor of Women's Studies at the University of Winnipeg.

Name: Cyberpop: Digital Lifestyles and Commodity Culture (Hardback)Routledge 
Description: By Sidney Eve Matrix. Cyberpop is an analysis of cyberculture and its popular cultural productions. The study begins with a Foucaultian model of cyberculture as a discursive formation, and explains how some key concepts (such as 'virtuality,'...
Categories: Cultural Studies, Media & Film Studies