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German Romanticism and Science

The Procreative Poetics of Goethe, Novalis, and Ritter

By Jocelyn Holland

Routledge – 2009 – 222 pages

Series: Routledge Studies in Romanticism

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    978-0-415-65496-8
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Description

Situated at the intersection of literature and science, Holland's study draws upon a diverse corpus of literary and scientific texts which testify to a cultural fascination with procreation around 1800. Through readings which range from Goethe’s writing on metamorphosis to Novalis’s aphorisms and novels and Ritter’s Fragments from the Estate of a Young Physicist, Holland proposes that each author contributes to a scientifically-informed poetics of procreation. Rather than subscribing to a single biological theory (such as epigenesis or preformation), these authors take their inspiration from a wide inventory of procreative motifs and imagery.

Reviews

"Holland’s insightful and compelling account brings alive some important debates in Romantic science, illuminating a fascinating chapter in the history of vitalism and materialism alike." Paul Bishop, University of Glasgow, UK, Modern Language Review

Contents

Acknowledgments

Chapter One: Introduction

Chapter Two: Poetic Procreation and Goethe’s Theory of Metamorphosis

Chapter Three: Friedrich von Hardenberg and the Discourse of Procreation

Chapter Four: The Poet as Artisan and the Instruments of Procreation

Chapter Five: Johann Wilhelm Ritter and the Writing of Life

Chapter Six: Procreative Thinking - Scientific Projects

Conclusion

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Author Bio

Jocelyn Holland is Assistant Professor, Department of German and the Program for Comparative Literature at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Name: German Romanticism and Science: The Procreative Poetics of Goethe, Novalis, and Ritter (Hardback)Routledge 
Description: By Jocelyn Holland. Situated at the intersection of literature and science, Holland's study draws upon a diverse corpus of literary and scientific texts which testify to a cultural fascination with procreation around 1800. Through readings which range from...
Categories: Literature & Gender Studies, German Literature, Romanticism