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The Experience of Modernism

Modern Architects and the Future City, 1928-53

By John R. Gold

Taylor & Francis – 1997 – 278 pages

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $98.95
    978-0-419-20740-5
    November 27th 1997

Description

Making extensive use of information gained from in-depth interviews with architects active in the period between 1928-1953, the author provides a sympathetic understanding of the Modern Movement's architectural role in reshaping the fabric and structure of British metropolitan cities in the post-war period and traces the links between the experience of British modernists and the wider international modern movement.

Reviews

'Crammed to bursting with valuable evidence and sharp insight… undoubtedly makes an important contribution to the contemporary re-evaluation of architectural modernism.' - RIBA

'A remarkably detailed account…Gold's book is a beautifully researched and gently ironical account of events and ideologies that are slipping away from living memory.' - The Architects' Journal

'The definitive account of British involvement in the modern movement.' - Deborah Lewittes, JSAH, 2005

'His [Gold's] discussions of the MARS Group's exhibition New Architecture (1938) and reconstruction scheme for London … remain the most useful analyses of these activities.' - Deborah Lewittes, JSAH, 2005

'A crucial step toward an in-depth account of modern architecture in Britain.' - Deborah Lewittes, JSAH, 2005

Contents

Introduction. Anticipations. Staking a Claim. Finding One Another. Exhibiting the Future. Projects and Plans. Marking Time. Dreams and False Expectations. Old and New Agenda. Notes and References. Index

Name: The Experience of Modernism: Modern Architects and the Future City, 1928-53 (Paperback)Taylor & Francis 
Description: By John R. Gold. Making extensive use of information gained from in-depth interviews with architects active in the period between 1928-1953, the author provides a sympathetic understanding of the Modern Movement's architectural role in reshaping the fabric and...
Categories: Architectural History, Theory of Architecture