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Indigenous Educational Models for Contemporary Practice

In Our Mother's Voice

Edited by Maenette K.P. A Benham, Joanne Elizabet Cooper

Routledge – 2000

Series: Sociocultural, Political, and Historical Studies in Education

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    Description

    What is the philosophy that should drive native education policy and practice? In July 1997 a group of native educational leaders from the United States (including Alaska and Hawai'i), Canada, Australia, and New Zealand gathered to define a potential solution to this question. This book passes on the individual educational philosophies of the participants and captures the essence of each in a dynamic, transformational, and holistic model--"Go to the Source"--which forwards a collective vision for a native language- and culture-based educational philosophy that native educational leaders and teachers, policymakers, and curriculum developers can use to ground their work. For more information visit http://ed-web2.educ.msu.edu/voice/

    Contents

    Contents: J. Spring, From the Series Editor. V. Johnson, Foreword. Preface. M.K.P. Benham, J.E. Cooper, Gathering Together to Travel to the Source: A Vision for a Language and Culture-Based Educational Model. OUR DIFFERENT PATHS TO THE SOURCE:^R Transitions I: Path to a Native Epistemology--The Lightning Tree. K. Cherrington, Building a Child-Centered Model: "An Indigenous Model Must Look to the Future." J. Armstrong, A Holistic Education, Teachings From the Dance-House: "We Cannot Afford to Lose One Native Child." L. Aranga-Low, Grounding Vision on the Three Baskets of Knowledge: "Kia ora ai te iwi Maori." Transition II: Path to Native Language and Cultural Revitalization: "Everything You Need to Know Is in the Language." S. Keahi, Advocating for a Stimulating and Language-Based Education: "If You Don't Learn Your Language Where Can You Go Home To?" D. Kipp, A Commitment to Language-Based Education: "Among the Gifts We Can Give Our Children Is Our Cultural Traditions." K. Silva, Revitalizing Culture and Language: "Returning to the 'Aina." G. Kiernan, Building an Indigenous Language Center: "The Children Have the Right to Learn Their Language." Transitions: Path to the Spirit. Transition III: Path to the Spirit: "We Are Walking in a Sacred Manner." S. Suina, Linking Native People Around the Spirituality of All Life: "The Gifts of Our Grandmothers and Grandfathers." G. Gollnick, Creating a Ceremony: "Nature's Model From the Longhouse People." Transitions: Path to Community. Transition IV: Path to Community: "We Want to Remain the Person That Stops and Cares for the Grandparent." L.A. Napier, Building Linkages Across the Community: "To Take Action, Takes Great Courage and Strength." P. Johnson, Envisioning a Community-Centered Education: "We Do Not Own Our Children We Must Honor Them in All Ways." M. Wright, The Circle We Call Community: "As a Community, You All Have to Pull Together." S. Wetere-Bryant, Educational Empowerment for Maori People: "We Are on the Right Path. We Are on the Right Dreaming." R. Medcraft, Locating Global Learning Centers: "With the United Forces of Us All." B. Medicine, Afterword. J. Garcia, Appendix A: Exemplary Native Educational Programs in the United States. Resources for Native Educators. Appendix B: Resources for Native Educators.

    Name: Indigenous Educational Models for Contemporary Practice: In Our Mother's Voice (eBook)Routledge 
    Description: Edited by Maenette K.P. A Benham, Joanne Elizabet Cooper. What is the philosophy that should drive native education policy and practice? In July 1997 a group of native educational leaders from the United States (including Alaska and Hawai'i), Canada, Australia, and New Zealand gathered to define a...
    Categories: Bilingualism / ESL, Multicultural Education, Sociology of Education