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The Decline and Fall of Hemispheric Specialization

By Robert Efron

Psychology Press – 1990 – 128 pages

Series: Distinguished Lecture Series

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartHardback: $45.00
    978-0-8058-0716-5
    May 31st 1990

Description

Providing a personal overview of hemispheric differences in human cognitive activity, Professor Efron is selective in his presentation of significant issues. To ensure a balanced overview, references are made to many books, review articles, and research reports that present opposing positions. Although additional material has been included in this book, the informal style of the oral presentation has not been altered. This volume may be perceived as a report of one man's opinion; however, the conclusions may reflect the views of a "silent majority" of cognitive neuroscientists.

Reviews

"Dr. Efron must be applauded for the creation of such a brilliant work. This book will prove invaluable to any teacher who aims to help students understand hemispheric specialization and would also serve as an excellent supplemental text for any course in neuropsychology. Throughout the text, there is a remarkable clarity of logic…"

The Psychological Record

"…presents a focused, intense critique of the presently popular assumption that left and right performance asymmetries reflect hemispheric specialization."

Contemporary Psychology

"Efron has produced compelling reasons to be skeptical of the claims of 'left-brain, right-brain' advocates, and for those who needed no convincing, some elegant and powerful ammunition."

American Scientist

"…a stimulating and readable critique of a very popular topic."

American Journal of Psychology

Contents

Contents: The Decline of Hemispheric Specialization. The Fall of Hemispheric Specialization. Life After Hemispheric Specialization.

Related Subjects

  1. Neuropsychology

Name: The Decline and Fall of Hemispheric Specialization (Hardback)Psychology Press 
Description: By Robert Efron. Providing a personal overview of hemispheric differences in human cognitive activity, Professor Efron is selective in his presentation of significant issues. To ensure a balanced overview, references are made to many books, review articles, and research...
Categories: Neuropsychology