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The Neuropsychology of High-level Vision

Collected Tutorial Essays

Edited by Martha J. Farah, Graham Ratcliff

Psychology Press – 1994 – 400 pages

Series: Carnegie Mellon Symposia on Cognition Series

Purchasing Options:

  • Paperback:
    978-0-8058-0911-4
    April 30th 1994
    Out-of-print
  • Add to CartHardback: $125.00
    978-0-8058-0910-7
    April 30th 1994

Description

This book provides a state-of-the-art review of high-level vision and the brain. Topics covered include object representation and recognition, category-specific visual knowledge, perceptual processes in reading, top-down processes in vision -- including attention and mental imagery -- and the relations between vision and conscious awareness. Each chapter includes a tutorial overview emphasizing the current state of knowledge and outstanding theoretical issues in the authors' area of research, along with a more in-depth report of an illustrative research project in the same area.

The editors and contributors to this volume are among the most respected figures in the field of neuropsychology and perception, making the work presented here a standard-setting text and reference in that area.

Reviews

"The last ten years have seen greatly increased interest in how neurological disorders can inform our understanding of higher level vision. A variety of striking new phenomena have been uncovered and new theoretical approaches developed. This excellently organised book brings together in-depth analyses by nearly all the leading experts on the topic. It will become the definitive work in the field."

Professor Tim Shallice

University College, London

Contents

Contents: Preface. Part I: Object Representation and Recognition. A. Cowey, Cortical Visual Areas and the Neurobiology of Higher Visual Processes. D.I. Perrett, M.W. Oram, J.K. Hietanen, P.J. Benson, Issues of Representation in Object Vision. G.W. Humphreys, M.J. Riddoch, N. Donnelly, T. Freeman, M. Boucart, H.M. Muller, Intermediate Visual Processing and Visual Agnosia. F. Newcombe, Z. Mehta, E.H.F. de Haan, Category Specificity in Visual Recognition. M.J. Farah, Specialization within Visual Object Recognition: Clues from Prosopagnosia and Alexia. Part II: Visual Word Recognition. M. Arguin, D.N. Bub, Functional Mechanisms in Pure Alexia: Evidence from Letter Processing. M. Behrmann, Neglect Dyslexia: Attention and Word Recognition. Part III: Top-Down Processes in Vision: Attention and Imagery. M.I. Posner, P.G. Grossenbacher, P.E. Compton, Visual Attention. M.H. Johnson, Dissociating Components of Visual Attention: A Neurodevelopmental Approach. S.M. Kosslyn, L.M. Shin, Visual Mental Images in the Brain: Current Issues. Part IV: High-Level Vision With and Without Awareness. H.B. Coslett, E.M. Saffran, Mechanisms of Implicit Reading in Alexia. A.W. Young, Covert Recognition. M.A. Wallace, Implicit Perception in Visual Neglect: Implications for Theories of Attention.

Name: The Neuropsychology of High-level Vision: Collected Tutorial Essays (Hardback)Psychology Press 
Description: Edited by Martha J. Farah, Graham Ratcliff. This book provides a state-of-the-art review of high-level vision and the brain. Topics covered include object representation and recognition, category-specific visual knowledge, perceptual processes in reading, top-down processes in vision -- including...
Categories: Cognitive Neuropsychology, Cognitive Science