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Toys, Games, and Media

Edited by Jeffrey Goldstein, David Buckingham, Gilles Brougere

Routledge – 2005 – 264 pages

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $44.95
    978-0-8058-5829-7
    July 14th 2005
  • Add to CartHardback: $110.00
    978-0-8058-4903-5
    June 7th 2004

Description

This book is a state-of-the-art look at where toys have come from and where they are likely to go in the years ahead. The focus is on the interplay between traditional toys and play, and toys and play that are mediated by or combined with digital technology. As well as covering the technical aspects of computer mediated play activities, the authors consider how technologically enhanced toys are currently used in traditional play and how they are woven into childrens' lives. The authors contrast their findings about technologically enhanced toys with knowledge of traditional toys and play. They link their studies of toys to goals in education and to entertainment and information transfer.

This book will appeal to students, researchers, teachers, child care workers and more broadly the entertainment industry. It is appropriate for courses that deal with the specialized subject of toys and games, media studies, education and teacher training, and child development.

Reviews

"Toys, Games, and Media provides an impressive overview of the toy culture, children, and digital media, and the influence of technology on play." "Highly Recommended."

CHOICE

"Toys, Games, and Media provides a fascinating picture of the ways in which computer-mediated play is transforming the lives of both children and adults in the twenty-first century. It both raises and helps to answer important questions about our rapidly changing media environment. The book has much to recommend it. Its perspective is multicultural."

Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly

Contents

Contents: G. Brougere, D. Buckingham, J. Goldstein, Introduction: Toys, Games, and Media. Part I:Toy Culture. A. Powers, The Revival of the English Toy Theatre. G. Wegener-Spohring, War Toys in the World of Fourth Graders. W. Hartmann, G. Brougere, Toy Culture in Preschool Education and Children's Toy Preferences. C.R. Yano, Kitty Litter: Japanese Cute at Home and Abroad. E. Grugeon, From Pokemon to Potter: Trainee Teachers Explore Children's Media-Related Play, 2000-2003. Part II:Children and Digital Media. E. Seiter, The Internet Playground. M. Albero-Andres, The Internet and Adolescents: The Present and Future of the Information Society. S. Kline, Learners, Spectators, or Gamers? An Investigation of Digital Play in the Media Saturated Household. J. Linderoth, B. Lindstrom, M. Alexandersson, Learning With Computer Games. Part III:How Technology Influences Play. M. Allen, Tangible Interfaces in 'Smart Toys'. D. Bergen, Preschool Children's Play With Rescue Heroes: Effects of Technology-Enhanced Figures on the Themes of Play. L. Plowman, R. Luckin, Children's Interaction with 'Smart' Toys. M. Fabregat, M. Costa, M. Romero, Adaptation of Traditional Toys and Games to New Technologies: New Products Generation.

Name: Toys, Games, and Media (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by Jeffrey Goldstein, David Buckingham, Gilles Brougere. This book is a state-of-the-art look at where toys have come from and where they are likely to go in the years ahead. The focus is on the interplay between traditional toys and play, and toys and play that are mediated by or combined with digital...
Categories: Developmental Psychology, Advertising Studies, Media Education