Skip to Content

Generation 1.5 in College Composition

Teaching Academic Writing to U.S.-Educated Learners of ESL

Edited by Mark Roberge, Meryl Siegal, Linda Harklau

Routledge – 2008 – 288 pages

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $59.95
    978-0-8058-6443-4
    February 12th 2009
  • Add to CartHardback: $175.00
    978-0-8058-6442-7
    February 12th 2009

Description

'… A well-organized volume with a strong emphasis on pedagogy.'Trudy Smoke, Hunter College/City University of New York, USA

'Generation 1.5 is the most interesting topic of concern in ESL today, yet publications are few and far between…. The editors clearly know what they’re doing…. They know the field, know the subject matter, and understand the problems…. This volume contributes to the thinking in the field.'Linda Lonon Blanton, University of New Orleans, USA

Building on the work that has been done over the past decade, this volume provides theoretical frameworks for understanding debates about immigrant students, studies of students’ schooling paths and language and literacy experiences, and pedagogical approaches for working with Generation 1.5 students.

Generation 1.5 in College Composition:

  • is designed to help both scholars and practitioners reconceptualize the fields of College Composition and TESOL and create a space for research, theory, and pedagogy focusing on postsecondary immigrant ESL students
  • provides both important new theoretical work (which lays the underpinnings for serious pedagogical innovation) and important new pedagogical approaches.

Because of their varied and complex language and literacy profiles, Generation 1.5 students are found in developmental English courses, college ESL courses, and mainstream college writing courses. This volume is directed to preservice and inservice teachers, teacher educators, and researchers involved with educating Generation 1.5 students in these and other contexts.

Reviews

"… a well-organized volume with a strong emphasis on pedagogy."

Trudy Smoke, Hunter College/City University of New York

"Generation 1.5 is the most interesting topic of concern in ESL today, yet publications are few and far between…. The editors clearly know what they’re doing…. They know the field, know the subject matter, understand the problems…. This volume contributes to the thinking in the field."

Linda Lonon Blanton, University of New Orleans

Contents

@contents: Selected Contents

Introduction

Generation 1.5 ten years later, Mark Roberge, Meryl Siegal and Linda Harklau

Section One: Frameworks for understanding Generation 1.5

  1. Approaching Generation 1.5 through immigrant studies and socio-political/socio-economic frameworks, Vivian Louie
  2. Language minorities in higher education—What we (don’t) know, Linda Harklau
  3. The complex linguistic situation of Generation 1.5 students, Mary Schmida
  4. The Erasure of Resident ESL Writers, Paul Kei Matsuda and Aya Matsuda

Section Two: Generation 1.5 student characteristics and schooling paths

  1. Generation 1.5 immigrant ESL students: What experiences, characteristics and needs might they bring to our English classes? Mark Roberge
  2. Academic reading and writing challenges and strategies used to meet those challenges: A case of four undergraduate Generation 1.5 students, Cathryn Crosby
  3. At what price success? The academic writing development of a Generation 1.5 latecomer, Jan Frodesen
  4. Generation 1.5 students and the hegemony of dominant language ideologies, Jennifer A. Mott-Smith
  5. Accessing academic literacy in college: Pathways of U.S.-educated English language learners, Genevieve Patthey-Chavez, Joan Thomas-Spiegel, and Paul Dillon

Section Three: Pedagogical approaches for Generation 1.5

  1. Pedagogical principles and practices for working with Generation 1.5, Patricia Porter, Deborah VanDommelen, Sugie Goen-Salter, and Deborah Swanson
  2. Reading/writing connections for Generation 1.5, Harriett Allison

3. Vocabulary and reading for Generation 1.5, Cheryl Benz

A functional focus on language: Grammar for Generation 1.5, Mary J. Schleppegrell

  1. Socioliterate pedagogy for Generation 1.5, Ann Johns
  2. Charting new territory: Creating an interdepartmental writing course for Generation 1.5, Christine Holten
  3. Individualizing pedagogy: Working with diverse needs and goals in freshman composition for international students and Generation 1.5, Dudley Reynolds, Kyung-Hee Bae and Jennifer Shade Wilson
  4. Situating language and academic literacy development into a curriculum of first-year college courses for Generation 1.5, Robin Murie

  5. Promoting Generation 1.5 learners’ academic literacy and autonomy: Pedagogical approaches from the learning center, Margi Wald and Nathalie Destandau

Conclusion

Where do we go from here? Mark Roberge, Meryl Siegal and Linda Harklau

Author Bio

Mark Roberge is Associate Professor in the Composition program at San Francisco State University.

Meryl Siegal is Instructor of English at Laney College in Oakland, California.

Linda Harklau is Professor in the Teaching Additional Languages program and Linguistics program at the University of Georgia.

Name: Generation 1.5 in College Composition: Teaching Academic Writing to U.S.-Educated Learners of ESL (Paperback)Routledge 
Description: Edited by Mark Roberge, Meryl Siegal, Linda Harklau. '… A well-organized volume with a strong emphasis on pedagogy.' – Trudy Smoke, Hunter College/City University of New York, USA 'Generation 1.5 is the most interesting topic of concern in ESL today, yet...
Categories: Bilingualism / ESL, English, Writing