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Aspects of Rationality

Reflections on What It Means To Be Rational and Whether We Are

By Raymond S. Nickerson

Psychology Press – 2007

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Description

What does it mean to be rational – to reason well and effectively? How does rationality, broadly conceived, relate to the knowledge one acquires, the beliefs one forms, the explanations one constructs or appropriates, the judgments and decisions one makes, the values one adopts? What is the character of human reasoning and, in particular, does it tend to be rational?

Much has been written about human rationality – or lack thereof. In recent years, some writers have focused attention on the numerous ways in which people appear not to be rational, at least if being rational is taken to mean always thinking or behaving in accordance with some normative standard. Others have argued that, if human reasoning is as flawed as this work suggests, it is a wonder that we, as a species, are around to notice the fact.

This book examines much of the experimental research on reasoning as it relates to a variety of conceptions of rationality, not limited to conformity of thought and behavior or to the dictates of one or another normative system. The discussion focuses on specific topics that represent essential aspects of any adequately inclusive conception of rationality: intelligence and knowledge; beliefs; goals, values and affect; explanations; judgment and choice; understanding and wisdom.

Contents

1. What is Rationality? 2. The Search for Standards of Rationality. 3. Intelligence and Knowledge. 4. Beliefs. 5. Goals, Value, and Affect. 6. Explanations. 7. Preferences and Judgment. 8. Decision and Choice. 9. Understanding and Wisdom. 10. The Relativity of Rationality. 11. Conclusions and a View.

Author Bio

Raymond S. Nickerson, retired senior vice president of Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc. and research professor at Tufts University, is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, and the Society of Experimental Psychologists. He is the founding editor of The Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, the founding and series editor of Reviews of Human Factors and Ergonomics, an annual publication of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, and the author of several books, including Mathematical Reasoning: Patterns, Problems, Conjectures, and Proofs (Psychology Press, 2010).

Name: Aspects of Rationality: Reflections on What It Means To Be Rational and Whether We Are (Hardback)Psychology Press 
Description: By Raymond S. Nickerson. What does it mean to be rational – to reason well and effectively? How does rationality, broadly conceived, relate to the knowledge one acquires, the beliefs one forms, the explanations one constructs or appropriates, the judgments and...
Categories: Cognitive Psychology, Cognitive Science, Thinking, Reasoning & Problem Solving