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Selective Deficits in Developmental Cognitive Neuropsychology

A Special Issue of Cognitive Neuropsychology

Edited by Bradley C. Duchaine

Psychology Press – 2006 – 120 pages

Series: Special Issues of Cognitive Neuropsychology

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartPaperback: $72.95
    978-1-84169-813-7
    July 19th 2006

Description

Traditionally, cognitive neuropsychology has focused on selective impairments in individuals who suffered brain damage as adults. However, in recent years, there have been a number of cognitive neuropsychological studies of selective impairments due to developmental deficits. Papers in Selective Deficits in Developmental Cognitive Neuropsychology include a diverse range of disorders involving those affecting spatial orientation, face recognition, reading, and memory. These papers illustrate the value of this approach and its promise as a means to gain insight into cognition and its neural and developmental basis.

Contents

B.C. Duchaine, Introduction. M. McCloskey, J. Valtonen, J. Sherman, Representing Orientation: A Coordinate-System Hypothesis, and Evidence from Developmental Deficits. B.C. Duchaine, G. Yovel, E.J. Butterworth, K. Nakayama, Prosopagnosia as an Impairment to Face-Specific Mechanism: Elimination of the Alternative Hypotheses in a Developmental Case. S. White, U. Frith, E. Milne, S. Rosen, J. Swettenham, F. Ramus, A Double Dissociation between Sensorimotor Impairments and Reading Disability: A Comparison of Autistic and Dyslexic Children. C.M. Temple, P. Richardson, Developmental Amnesia: Fractionation of Developing Memory Systems.

Name: Selective Deficits in Developmental Cognitive Neuropsychology: A Special Issue of Cognitive Neuropsychology (Paperback)Psychology Press 
Description: Edited by Bradley C. Duchaine. Traditionally, cognitive neuropsychology has focused on selective impairments in individuals who suffered brain damage as adults. However, in recent years, there have been a number of cognitive neuropsychological studies of selective impairments due to...
Categories: Cognitive Neuropsychology, Child Neuropsychology