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Power, Choice and Vulnerability

A Case Study in Disaster Mismanagement in South India

By Peter Winchester

Routledge – 1992 – 236 pages

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartHardback: $120.00
    978-1-873936-05-4
    January 1st 1992

Description

Natural disasters make dramatic reading. Every year, some area of the world is devastated by a disaster, with enormous consequent loss of life and disruption to livelihoods. What can be done to alleviate this? Why are such disasters so lethal? Why do people expose themselves to such hazards? Do mitigation programmes help? What effect does aid really have on the areas that receive it? By examining one particular cyclone-prone area of Southern India in great detail over a 10-year period Peter Winchester has come up with some perceptive answers to the questions. In particular, he formulates a set of five 'golden rules' for disaster management. The book will provide valuable and thought-provoking reading for anyone involved with disaster management, and will be essential for all those whose work involves aid or development in disaster-prone areas.

Contents

Preface * Cyclone Mitigation Policy * A Conceptual Model of Vulnerability * The Study Area and the Fieldwork Programme * The Cyclone of 1977 and Changes in Divi Seema 1977-78 * Testing the Model * The Most Vulnerable households * Golden Rules for Disaster Management * Bibliography * Appendices * Index

Author Bio

Peter Winchester worked for many years as an architect, during which time he became involved with housing in the developing world. The lack of understanding often shown by his profession in the social and political contexts in which they worked promoted his move into academic research. He now works as a consultant for the Flood Hazard Research Centre at Middlesex Polytechnic in London.

Name: Power, Choice and Vulnerability: A Case Study in Disaster Mismanagement in South India (Hardback)Routledge 
Description: By Peter Winchester. Natural disasters make dramatic reading. Every year, some area of the world is devastated by a disaster, with enormous consequent loss of life and disruption to livelihoods. What can be done to alleviate this? Why are such disasters so lethal? Why do...
Categories: Sustainable Development, Health Geography