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An Introduction to Ecological Economics

By Robert Costanza, John H Cumberland, Herman Daly, Robert Goodland, Richard B Norgaard

CRC Press – 1997 – 288 pages

Purchasing Options:

  • Add to CartHardback: $104.95
    978-1-884015-72-4
    August 10th 1997

Description

Ecological economics is a way of rethinking the relationship between humans and the environment and working out the implications of how we manage our lives and the planet. An Introduction to Ecological Economics offers a starting point for undergraduate and graduate students and environmental professionals interested in this transdisciplinary field. Beginning in Section 1 with a description of some current problems in society and their underlying causes, Section 2 then takes a historical perspective to explain how world views regarding economics and ecology have evolved. Section 3 presents the fundamental principles of ecological economics, and Part 4 outlines and discusses a set of policies for creating a sustainable society as well as instruments that could be used to implement those policies. A conclusions section summarizes the main points of the book and proposes prospects for the future. Let An Introduction to Ecological Economics introduce you to important issues affecting our ecology, our economy, our world.

Reviews

"Ecological economics is arguably the single most important academic discipline today. Indeed, one of the most cheering events in the last decade or so has been the increasing cooperation of ecologists and economists, and the gradual reintegration of their disciplines. An Introduction to Ecological Economics provides students with the results of that cooperation, giving an excellent overview of ecological economics today."

-Paul R. Ehrlich, Bing Professor of Population Studies, Stanford University

"What a splendid overview of what will likely prove to be one of the most vital of all disciplines in the new millennium. Contrary to much conventional economics, the authors demonstrate-with splendid elan and massive documentation-that the global economy is a wholly owned subsidiary of the planetary ecosystem. I have just one basic reaction: right on, write on."

-Norman Myers, Green College, Oxford University and Senior Fellow, World Wildlife Fund-U.S.

Contents

Humanity's Current Dilemma

The Global Ecosystem and the Economic Subsystem

From Localized Limits to Global Limits

Population and Poverty

Beyond Brunt Land

Toward Sustainability

The Fragmentation of Economics and the Natural Sciences

The Historical Development of Economics and Ecology

The Early Codevelopment of Economics and Natural Science

Economics and Ecology Specialize and Separate

The Reintegration of Ecology and Economics

Problems and Principles of Ecological Economics

Sustainable Scale, Fair Distribution, and Efficient Allocation

Ecosystems, Biodiversity, and Ecological Services

Substitutability vs. Complementarity of Natural, Human, and Manufactured Capital

Population and Carrying Capacity

Measuring Welfare and Well-Being

Valuation, Choice, and Uncertainty

Trade and Community

Policies, Institutions, and Instruments

The Need to Develop a Shared Vision of a Sustainable Society

History of Environmental Institutions and Instruments

Successes, Failures, and Remedies

Policy Instruments

Further Reading

References

Index

Name: An Introduction to Ecological Economics (Hardback)CRC Press 
Description: By Robert Costanza, John H Cumberland, Herman Daly, Robert Goodland, Richard B Norgaard. Ecological economics is a way of rethinking the relationship between humans and the environment and working out the implications of how we manage our lives and the planet. An Introduction to Ecological Economics offers a starting point for undergraduate...
Categories: Environmental Law - Environmental Studies, Ecological Economics