Skip to Content

Book Series

Psychological Issues

Series Editor: David Wolitzky

The basic mission of Psychological Issues is to contribute to the further development of psychoanalysis as a science, as a respected scholarly enterprise, as a theory of human behavior, and as a therapeutic method.

Over the past 50 years, the series has focused on fundamental aspects and foundations of psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice, as well as on work in related disciplines relevant to psychoanalysis. Psychological Issues does not aim to represent or promote a particular point of view. The contributions cover broad and integrative topics of vital interest to all psychoanalysts as well as to colleagues in related disciplines. They cut across particular schools of thought and tackle key issues, such as the philosophical underpinnings of psychoanalysis, psychoanalytic theories of motivation, conceptions of therapeutic action, the nature of unconscious mental functioning, psychoanalysis and social issues, and reports of original empirical research relevant to psychoanalysis. The authors often take a critical stance toward theories and offer a careful theoretical analysis and conceptual clarification of the complexities of theories and their clinical implications, drawing upon relevant empirical findings from psychoanalytic research as well as from research in related fields.

The Editorial Board continues to invite contributions from social/behavioral sciences such as anthropology and sociology, from biologcal sciences such as physiology and the various brain sciences, and from scholarly humanistic disciplines such as philosophy, law, and ethics.

New and Published Books

1-4 of 4 results in Psychological Issues
  • Page:
  • 1
  1. Myths of Termination

    What patients can teach psychoanalysts about endings

    By Judy Leopold Kantrowitz

    Series: Psychological Issues

    Psychoanalysis can make a huge difference in the lives of patients, their families and others they encounter. Myths have developed, however, about how psychoanalysis should end – what patients experience and what analysts do. These expectations come primarily from accounts by analysts in the...

    Published July 9th 2014 by Routledge

  2. Identity and the New Psychoanalytic Explorations of Self-organization

    By Mardi Horowitz

    Series: Psychological Issues

    Advances in science and the humanities have demonstrated the complexity of psychological, social and neurological factors influencing identity. A contemporary discourse is needed to anchor the concepts required in speaking about identity in present day understanding. In Identity and the New...

    Published May 21st 2014 by Routledge

  3. Memory, Myth, and Seduction

    Unconscious Fantasy and the Interpretive Process

    By Jean-Georges Schimek

    Edited by Deborah L. Browning

    Series: Psychological Issues

    Memory, Myth, and Seduction reveals the development and evolution of Jean-Georges Schimek's thinking on unconscious fantasy and the interpretive process derived from a close reading of Freud as well as contemporary psychoanalysis. Contributing richly to North American psychoanalytic thought,...

    Published January 9th 2011 by Routledge

  4. From Classical to Contemporary Psychoanalysis

    A Critique and Integration

    By Morris N. Eagle

    Series: Psychological Issues

    The landscape of psychoanalysis has changed, at times dramatically, in the hundred or so years since Freud first began to think and write about it. Freudian theory and concepts have risen, fallen, evolved, mutated, and otherwise reworked themselves in the hands and minds of analysts the world over,...

    Published January 5th 2011 by Routledge

  • Page:
  • 1

Forthcoming Books

  1. Frontiers of Clinical Practice: The new science of prosocial motivations and intersubjective experience
    By Mauricio Cortina
    To Be Published June 29th 2015

Search for Book Series