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Routledge Studies in Cultural History

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11-20 of 32 results in Routledge Studies in Cultural History
  1. Disease and Crime

    A History of Social Pathologies and the New Politics of Health

    Edited by Robert Peckham

    Series: Routledge Studies in Cultural History

    Disease and crime are increasingly conflated in the contemporary world. News reports proclaim "epidemics" of crime, while politicians denounce terrorism as a lethal pathological threat. Recent years have even witnessed the development of a new subfield, "epidemiological criminology," which merges...

    Published October 10th 2013 by Routledge

  2. Identity, Aesthetics, and Sound in the Fin de Siècle

    Redesigning Perception

    By Dariusz Gafijczuk

    Series: Routledge Studies in Cultural History

    This book is an analytic and historical portrait of the volatile decades at the beginning of the 20th century. Engaging with avant-garde art and thought, and concentrating on two of the most controversial and still culturally relevant personalities of Viennese modernism - Sigmund Freud and...

    Published September 17th 2013 by Routledge

  3. Race, Science, and the Nation

    Reconstructing the Ancient Past in Britain, France and Germany

    By Chris Manias

    Series: Routledge Studies in Cultural History

    Across the nineteenth century, scholars in Britain, France and the German lands sought to understand their earliest ancestors: the Germanic and Celtic tribes known from classical antiquity, and the newly discovered peoples of prehistory. New fields – philology, archeology and anthropology –...

    Published May 22nd 2013 by Routledge

  4. Empires and Boundaries

    Race, Class, and Gender in Colonial Settings

    Edited by Harald Fischer-Tiné, Susanne Gehrmann

    Series: Routledge Studies in Cultural History

    Empires and Boundaries: Rethinking Race, Class, and Gender in Colonial Settings is an exciting collection of original essays exploring the meaning and existence of conflicting and coexisting hierarchies in colonial settings. With investigations into the colonial past of a diversity of regions...

    Published April 24th 2013 by Routledge

  5. A Social History of Disability in the Middle Ages

    Cultural Considerations of Physical Impairment

    By Irina Metzler

    Series: Routledge Studies in Cultural History

    What was it like to be disabled in the Middle Ages? How did people become disabled? Did welfare support exist? This book discusses social and cultural factors affecting the lives of medieval crippled, deaf, mute and blind people, those nowadays collectively called "disabled." Although the word did...

    Published March 7th 2013 by Routledge

  6. Americans Experience Russia

    Encountering the Enigma, 1917 to the Present

    Edited by Choi Chatterjee, Beth Holmgren

    Series: Routledge Studies in Cultural History

    Americans Experience Russia analyzes how American scholars, journalists, and artists envisioned, experienced, and interpreted Russia/the Soviet Union over the last century. While many histories of diplomatic, economic, and intellectual connections between the United States and the Soviet Union can...

    Published November 28th 2012 by Routledge

  7. Histories of Postmodernism

    Edited by Mark Bevir, Jill Hargis, Sara Rushing

    Series: Routledge Studies in Cultural History

    Histories of Postmodernism reexamines the history of the constellation of ideas and thinkers associated with postmodernism. The increasingly dominant historical narrative depicts a relatively smooth development of ideas from Friedrich Nietzsche and Martin Heidegger, through a range of French...

    Published June 21st 2012 by Routledge

  8. Neutrality in Twentieth-Century Europe

    Intersections of Science, Culture, and Politics after the First World War

    Edited by Rebecka Lettevall, Geert Somsen, Sven Widmalm

    Series: Routledge Studies in Cultural History

    Whether in science or in international politics, neutrality has sometimes been promoted, not only as a viable political alternative but as a lofty ideal – in politics by nations proclaiming their peacefulness, in science as an underpinning of epistemology, in journalism and other intellectual...

    Published May 29th 2012 by Routledge

  9. Politics of Memory

    Making Slavery Visible in the Public Space

    Edited by Ana Lucia Araujo

    Series: Routledge Studies in Cultural History

    The public memory of slavery and the Atlantic slave trade, which some years ago could be observed especially in North America, has slowly emerged into a transnational phenomenon now encompassing Europe, Africa, and Latin America, and even Asia – allowing the populations of African descent,...

    Published April 18th 2012 by Routledge

  10. Living in the City

    Urban Institutions in the Low Countries, 1200–2010

    Edited by L.A.C.J. (Leo) Lucassen, W.H. (Wim) Willems

    Series: Routledge Studies in Cultural History

    The city is a place to find shelter, a market place, and an elevator for social mobility and success. But the city is also a place that frightens people and that can marginalize newcomers. Living in the City tries to understand what pulls people to the city since the High Middle Ages, focusing on...

    Published December 22nd 2011 by Routledge