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Book Series

New Directions in the Philosophy of Education

Series Editor: Michael A Peters, Gert Biesta

This book series is devoted to the exploration of new directions in the philosophy of education. After the linguistic turn, the cultural turn, and the historical turn, where might we go? Does the future promise a digital turn with a greater return to connectionism, biology and biopolitics based on new understandings of system theory and knowledge ecologies? Does it foreshadow a genuinely alternative radical global turn based on a new openness and interconnectedness? Does it leave humanism behind or will it reengage with the question of the human in new and unprecedented ways? How should philosophy of education reflect new forces of globalization? How can it become less Anglo-centric and develop a greater sensitivity to other traditions, languages, and forms of thinking and writing, including those that are not routed in the canon of Western philosophy but in other traditions that share the ‘love of wisdom’ that characterizes the wide diversity within Western philosophy itself. Can this be done through a turn to intercultural philosophy? To indigenous forms of philosophy and philosophizing? Does it need a post-Wittgensteinian philosophy of education? A postpostmodern philosophy? Or should it perhaps leave the whole construction of 'post'-positions behind?

In addition to the question of the intellectual resources for the future of philosophy of education, what are the issues and concerns that philosophers of education should engage with? How should they position themselves? What is their specific contribution? What kind of intellectual and strategic alliances should they pursue? Should philosophy of education become more global, and if so, what would the shape of that be? Should it become more cosmopolitan or perhaps more decentred? Perhaps most importantly in the digital age, the time of the global knowledge economy that reprofiles education as privatized human capital and simultaneously in terms of an historic openness, is there a philosophy of education that grows out of education itself, out of the concerns for new forms of teaching, studying, learning and speaking that can provide comment on ethical and epistemological configurations of economics and politics of knowledge? Can and should this imply a reconnection with questions of democracy and justice?

This series comprises texts that explore, identify and articulate new directions in the philosophy of education. It aims to build bridges, both geographically and temporally: bridges across different traditions and practices and bridges towards a different future for philosophy of education.

New and Published Books

1-8 of 8 results in New Directions in the Philosophy of Education
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  1. Childhood, Education and Philosophy

    New ideas for an old relationship

    By Walter Kohan

    Series: New Directions in the Philosophy of Education

    This book explores the idea of a childlike education and offers critical tools to question traditional forms of education, and alternative ways to understand and practice the relationship between education and childhood. Engaging with the work of Michel Foucault, Jacques Rancière, Giorgio Agamben...

    Published November 12th 2014 by Routledge

  2. Edusemiotics

    Semiotic philosophy as educational foundation

    By Andrew Stables, Inna Semetsky

    Series: New Directions in the Philosophy of Education

    Edusemiotics addresses an emerging field of inquiry, educational semiotics, as a philosophy of and for education. Using "sign" as a unit of analysis, educational semiotics amalgamates philosophy, educational theory and semiotics. Edusemiotics draws on the intellectual legacy of such philosophers as...

    Published October 9th 2014 by Routledge

  3. Thomas Jefferson's Philosophy of Education

    A utopian dream

    By M. Andrew Holowchak

    Series: New Directions in the Philosophy of Education

    Thomas Jefferson had a profoundly advanced educational vision that went hand in hand with his political philosophy - each of which served the goal of human flourishing. His republicanism marked a break with the conservatism of traditional non-representative governments, characterized by birth and...

    Published June 30th 2014 by Routledge

  4. Henri Lefebvre and Education

    Space, history, theory

    By Sue Middleton

    Series: New Directions in the Philosophy of Education

    During his lifetime Henri Lefebvre (1901-1991) was renowned in France as a philosopher, sociologist and activist. Although he published more than 70 books, few were available in English until The Production of Space was translated in 1991. While this work - often associated with geography - has...

    Published November 13th 2013 by Routledge

  5. Buber and Education

    Dialogue as conflict resolution

    By W. John Morgan, Alexandre Guilherme

    Series: New Directions in the Philosophy of Education

    Martin Buber (1878-1965) is considered one of the 20th century’s greatest thinkers and his contributions to philosophy, theology and education are testimony to this. His thought is founded on the idea that people are capable of two kinds of relations, namely I-Thou and I-It, emphasising the...

    Published September 27th 2013 by Routledge

  6. African Philosophy of Education Reconsidered

    On being human

    By Yusef Waghid

    Series: New Directions in the Philosophy of Education

    Much of the literature on the African philosophy of education juxtaposes two philosophical strands as mutually exclusive entities; traditional ethnophilosophy on the one hand, and ‘scientific’ African philosophy on the other. While traditional ethnophilosophy is associated with the cultural...

    Published July 1st 2013 by Routledge

  7. On Study: Giorgio Agamben and educational potentiality

    By Tyson E. Lewis

    Series: New Directions in the Philosophy of Education

    In an educational landscape dominated by discourses and practices of learning, standardized testing, and the pressure to succeed, what space and time remain for studying? In this book, Tyson E. Lewis argues that studying is a distinctive educational experience with its own temporal, spatial,...

    Published May 30th 2013 by Routledge

  8. Education, Experience and Existence

    Engaging Dewey, Peirce and Heidegger

    By John Quay

    Series: New Directions in the Philosophy of Education

    Education, Experience and Existence proposes a new way of understanding education that delves beneath the conflict, confusion and compromise that characterize its long history. At the heart of this new understanding is what John Dewey strove to expound: a coherent theory of experience. Dewey’s...

    Published May 21st 2013 by Routledge

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