Skip to Content

Books by Subject

Jung & Analytical Psychology Books

You are currently browsing 11–20 of 248 new and published books in the subject of Jung & Analytical Psychology — sorted by publish date from newer books to older books.

For books that are not yet published; please browse forthcoming books.

New and Published Books – Page 2

  1. Subject to Change

    Jung, Gender and Subjectivity in Psychoanalysis

    By Polly Young-Eisendrath

    What can psychotherapy and psychoanalysis teach us about turning human misery into insight and personal freedom? Polly Young-Eisendrath offers a response that opens new vistas in our understanding of ourselves within the complexity of a postmodern world. Subject to Change is a collection of essays...

    Published June 9th 2014 by Routledge

  2. Jung's Theory of Personality

    A modern reappraisal

    By Clare Crellin

    Series: Research in Analytical Psychology and Jungian Studies

    This book provides a re-appraisal of Carl Jung’s work as a personality theorist. It offers a detailed consideration of Jung’s work and theory in order to demystify some of the ideas that psychologists have found most difficult, such as Jung’s religious and alchemical writings. The book shows why...

    Published June 4th 2014 by Routledge

  3. The Nightingale and the Hawk

    A Psychological Study of Keats' Ode

    By Katharine M. Wilson

    Series: Routledge Library Editions: Keats

    This book is the result of investiging whether Ode to a Nightingale could be interpreted as the record of an actual song that moved Keats so deeply as to involve, in Jung’s terms, an experience of the Self. . It is in effect a biographical study of one aspect of Keats’ life of the imagination. It...

    Published May 13th 2014 by Routledge

  4. Jung and Searles

    By David Sedgwick

    Jung and Searles is the first in-depth integration of the psychotherapeutic models of C.G. Jung and Harold F. Searles. Combining Jung's theoretical depths with Searles' liberating approach to the analytic process, David Sedgwick bridges the rift between analytical psychology and psychoanalysis and...

    Published April 9th 2014 by Routledge

  5. Jung and his Mystics

    In the end it all comes to nothing

    By John P. Dourley

    Jung’s psychology describes the origin of the Gods and their religions in terms of the impact of archetypal powers on consciousness. For Jung this impact is the basis of the numinous, the experience of the divine in nature and in human nature. His psychology, while possessed of a certain claim to...

    Published April 6th 2014 by Routledge

  6. Archetypal Psychotherapy

    The clinical legacy of James Hillman

    By Jason A. Butler

    Series: Research in Analytical Psychology and Jungian Studies

    Archetypal psychology is a post-Jungian mode of theory and practice initiated primarily through the prolific work of James Hillman. Hillman’s writing carries a far-reaching collection of evocative ideas with a wealth of vital implications for the field of clinical psychology. With the focus on...

    Published April 3rd 2014 by Routledge

  7. Carl Jung and Maximus the Confessor on Psychic Development

    The dynamics between the ‘psychological’ and the ‘spiritual’

    By G. C. Tympas

    In what ways does psychological development differ from spiritual development and psychological experience from spiritual experience? Bringing together two disparate theories under a trans-disciplinary framework, G. C. Tympas presents a comparison of Carl Jung’s theory of psychic development and...

    Published March 16th 2014 by Routledge

  8. Minding the Self

    Jungian meditations on contemporary spirituality

    By Murray Stein

    Many people have an aptitude for religious experience and spirituality but don't know how to develop this or take it further. Modern societies offer little assistance, and traditional religions are overly preoccupied with their own organizational survival. Minding the Self: Jungian meditations on...

    Published March 5th 2014 by Routledge

  9. Alchemy and Psychotherapy

    Post-Jungian Perspectives

    Edited by Dale Mathers

    Alchemical symbols are part of popular culture, most recently popularised in the Harry Potter books. Alchemy intrigued Carl Jung, the founder of analytical psychology. It inspired him as he wrote ‘the Red Book’ - the journal of his voyage of internal discovery. He devoted much of his life to it,...

    Published March 5th 2014 by Routledge

  10. The Alchemical Mercurius

    Esoteric symbol of Jung’s life and works

    By Mathew Mather

    Series: Research in Analytical Psychology and Jungian Studies

    The figure of the alchemical Mercurius features ubiquitously and radically in Jung’s later works, but despite this, there has been little research concerning Mercurius in Jungian studies to date. In this book, Mathew Mather explores the figure of the alchemical Mercurius and contextualises and...

    Published February 26th 2014 by Routledge