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Architectural History Books

You are currently browsing 151–160 of 209 new and published books in the subject of Architectural History — sorted by publish date from newer books to older books.

For books that are not yet published; please browse forthcoming books.

New and Published Books – Page 16

  1. Narrating Architecture

    A Retrospective Anthology

    Edited by James Madge, Andrew Peckham

    This anthology brings together the best and most interesting papers from the first ten years of The Journal of Architecture, published together for the first time in a single volume. Covering a wide range of topics of central importance to architecture today, the papers also address the related...

    Published June 6th 2006 by Routledge

  2. The Modern Period Room

    The Construction of the Exhibited Interior 1870–1950

    Edited by Penny Sparke, Brenda Martin, Trevor Keeble

    With contributors drawn from a broad range of disciplines, The Modern Period Room brings together a carefully selected collection of essays to consider the interiors of the modern era and their more recent reconstructions from a variety of different viewpoints. Contributions from leading design...

    Published May 9th 2006 by Routledge

  3. Architecture in Words

    Theatre, Language and the Sensuous Space of Architecture

    By Louise Pelletier

    What if the house you are about to enter was built with the confessed purpose of seducing you, of creating various sensations destined to touch your soul and make you reflect on who you are? Could architecture have such power? This was the assumption of generations of architects at the beginning of...

    Published May 4th 2006 by Routledge

  4. Representing Calcutta

    Modernity, Nationalism and the Colonial Uncanny

    By Swati Chattopadhyay

    Series: Asia's Transformations/Asia's Great Cities

    Representing Calcutta: Modernity, Nationalism, and the Colonial Uncanny is a spatial history of colonial Calcutta, addressing the question of modernity that haunts our perception of Calcutta. The book responds to two interrelated concerns about the city. The first is the image of Calcutta as the...

    Published March 14th 2006 by Routledge

  5. Architecture, Animal, Human

    The Asymmetrical Condition

    By Catherine T. Ingraham

    This book looks at specific instances in the Renaissance, Enlightenment and our own time when architectural ideas and ideas of biological life come into close proximity with each other. These convergences are fascinating and complex, offering new insights into architecture and its role....

    Published December 21st 2005 by Routledge

  6. Vernacular Architecture in the 21st Century

    Theory, Education and Practice

    Edited by Lindsay Asquith, Marcel Vellinga

    The issues surrounding the function and meaning of vernacular architecture in the twenty-first century are complex and extensive. Taking a distinctively rigorous theoretical approach, this book considers these issues from a number of perspectives, broadening current debate to a wider...

    Published December 12th 2005 by Taylor & Francis

  7. Palladio's Children

    Essays on Everyday Environment and the Architect

    By N.J. Habraken

    Edited by Jonathan Teicher

    Based on many years of personal observation, Palladio's Children critically examines the role of the architect as a professional descendent of Palladio, and as an heir to his architectural legacy. Seven innovative and carefully crafted essays explore the widening ideological schism...

    Published September 22nd 2005 by Taylor & Francis

  8. Garden History

    Philosophy and Design 2000 BC – 2000 AD

    By Tom Turner

    An updated version of this book is now available as European Gardens (2011), also by Tom Turner. Expanding into other regions are Asian Gardens (2010) and the forthcoming British Gardens, both also by Turner and published by Routledge. Tom Turner, well-known teacher and writer in landscape...

    Published August 31st 2005 by Routledge

  9. Utopias and Architecture

    By Nathaniel Coleman

    Utopian thought, though commonly characterized as projecting a future without a past, depends on golden models for re-invention of what is. Through a detailed and innovative re-assessment of the work of three architects who sought to represent a utopian content in their work, and a consideration of...

    Published August 23rd 2005 by Routledge

  10. Urban Memory

    History and Amnesia in the Modern City

    Edited by Mark Crinson

    Nine previously unpublished essays form an interdisciplinary assessment of urban memory in the modern city, analysing this burgeoning area of interest from the perspectives of sociology, architectural and art history, psychoanalysis, culture and critical theory. Featuring a wealth of illustrations,...

    Published June 1st 2005 by Routledge