Skip to Content

Books by Subject

History Books

You are currently browsing 1–10 of 6,535 new and published books in the subject of History — sorted by publish date from newer books to older books.

For books that are not yet published; please browse forthcoming books.

New and Published Books – Page 1

  1. Laura Ingalls Wilder

    American Writer on the Prairie

    By Sallie Ketcham

    Series: Routledge Historical Americans

    Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote stories that have defined the American frontier for generations of readers. As both author and character in her own books, she became one of the most famous figures in American children’s literature. Her famous Little House on the Prairie series, based on her childhood in...

    Published September 14th 2014 by Routledge

  2. Crime in England 1815-1880

    Experiencing the criminal justice system

    By Helen Johnston

    Crime in England, 1815-1880 provides a unique insight into crime and the criminal justice system from the early to the late nineteenth century. This book examines crime, criminality and punishment in nineteenth-century England by providing an overview of the key issues with regard to views about...

    Published September 14th 2014 by Routledge

  3. Russian/Soviet Military Psychiatry 1904-1945

    By Paul Wanke

    Psychiatry, like most professional fields in Russia, gained its legitimacy from its ability to serve the Tsar and later the Bolshevik party. The militarised nature of these governments meant that psychiatry would have to prove its worth to the military. This study will cover Russian/Soviet military...

    Published September 11th 2014 by Routledge

  4. The Aegean Civilization

    By G. Glotz

    Originally published between 1920-70,The History of Civilization was a landmark in early twentieth century publishing. It was published at a formative time within the social sciences, and during a period of decisive historical discovery. The aim of the general editor, C.K. Ogden, was to summarize...

    Published September 11th 2014 by Routledge

  5. Industrial England, 1776-1851

    By Dorothy Marshall

    Series: Economic History

    Dr Dorothy Marshall covers a vital period in English social development, during which the traditional social hierarchy of order and degree was giving place to a class society marked by the growth of a self-conscious working class. The author shows how, between 1776 and 1851, industrialization...

    Published September 11th 2014 by Routledge

  6. An Imperial War and the British Working Class

    Working-Class Attitudes and Reactions to the Boer War, 1899-1902

    By Richard Price

    First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company....

    Published September 11th 2014 by Routledge

  7. A Chinese Physician

    Wang Ji and the Stone Mountain Medical Case Histories

    By Joanna Grant

    Series: Needham Research Institute Series

    A Chinese Physician is the portrait of a 16th century medical writer and clinical practitioner. Drawing on socio-economic/biographic, textual, and gender analysis along side a variety of sources, from hagiographical biographies to medical case histories, the book tells three very different but...

    Published September 11th 2014 by Routledge

  8. Sainthood and Race

    Marked Flesh, Holy Flesh

    Edited by Molly H. Bassett, Vincent W. Lloyd

    Series: Routledge Studies in Religion

    In popular imagination, saints exhibit the best characteristics of humanity, universally recognizable but condensed and embodied in an individual. Recent scholarship has asked an array of questions concerning the historical and social contexts of sainthood, and opened new approaches to its study....

    Published September 11th 2014 by Routledge

  9. Twenty-nine Years in the West Indies and Central Africa

    A Review of Missionary Work and Adventure 1829-1858

    By The Rev Hope Masterton Wadell

    First published in 1970...

    Published September 11th 2014 by Routledge

  10. The CIA, the British Left and the Cold War

    Calling the Tune?

    By Hugh Wilford

    Series: Studies in Intelligence

    Shortly after it was founded in 1947, the CIA launched a secret effort to win the Cold War allegiance of the British left. Hugh Wilford traces the story of this campaign from its origins in Washington DC to its impact on Labour Party politicians, trade unionists, and Bloomsbury intellectuals...

    Published September 11th 2014 by Routledge