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African-American history Books

You are currently browsing 1–10 of 42 new and published books in the subject of African-American history — sorted by publish date from newer books to older books.

For books that are not yet published; please browse forthcoming books.

New and Published Books

  1. Concrete Demands

    The Search for Black Power in the 20th Century

    By Rhonda Y. Williams

    Between the 1950s and 1970s, Black Power coalesced as activists advocated a more oppositional approach to fighting racial oppression, emphasizing racial pride, asserting black political, cultural, and economic autonomy, and challenging white power. In Concrete Demands, Rhonda Y. Williams provides a...

    Published December 17th 2014 by Routledge

  2. Jesse Owens, the Press, and the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games

    By Pamela C. Laucella

    Series: Studies in African American History and Culture

    Jesse Owens secured his place as one of the most celebrated athletes of the twentieth-century after winning four gold medals at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. This book examines the press coverage of the time, which helped to elevate Owens to such status. Pamela C. Laucella utilizes examples not just...

    Published December 1st 2014 by Routledge

  3. A Queer Capital

    A History of Gay Life in Washington D.C.

    By Genny Beemyn

    Rooted in extensive archival research and personal interviews, A Queer Capital is the first history of LGBT life in the nation’s capital. Revealing a vibrant past that dates back more than 125 years, the book explores how lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals established spaces of their own before and...

    Published July 7th 2014 by Routledge

  4. Shadows of the Slave Past

    Memory, Heritage, and Slavery

    By Ana Lucia Araujo

    Series: Routledge Studies in Cultural History

    This book is a transnational and comparative study examining the processes that led to the memorialization of slavery and the Atlantic slave trade in the second half of the twentieth century. Araujo explores numerous kinds of initiatives such as monuments, memorials, and museums as well as heritage...

    Published June 25th 2014 by Routledge

  5. The Postwar Struggle for Civil Rights

    African Americans in San Francisco, 1945–1975

    By Paul T. Miller

    Series: Studies in African American History and Culture

    The war industries associated with World War II brought unparalleled employment opportunities for African Americans in San Francisco, a city whose African American population grew by over 650% between 1940 and 1945. With this population increase came an increase in racial discrimination directed at...

    Published February 14th 2014 by Routledge

  6. The Story of Black Military Officers, 1861-1948

    By Krewasky A. Salter I

    Series: Routledge Studies in African American History

    Black members of the military served in every war, conflict and military engagement between 1861 and 1948. Beyond serving only as enlisted soldiers and non-commissioned officers, many also served as commissioned officers in positions of leadership and authority. This book offers the first complete...

    Published January 13th 2014 by Routledge

  7. Color Matters

    Skin Tone Bias and the Myth of a Postracial America

    Edited by Kimberly Jade Norwood

    Series: New Directions in American History

    In the United States, as in many parts of the world, people are discriminated against based on the color of their skin. This type of skin tone bias, or colorism, is both related to and distinct from discrimination on the basis of race, with which it is often conflated. Preferential treatment of...

    Published December 9th 2013 by Routledge

  8. From Selma to Montgomery

    The Long March to Freedom

    By Barbara Harris Combs

    Series: Critical Moments in American History

    On March 7, 1965, a peaceful voting rights demonstration in Selma, Alabama, was met with an unprovoked attack of shocking violence that riveted the attention of the nation. In the days and weeks following "Bloody Sunday," the demonstrators would not be deterred, and thousands of others joined their...

    Published November 19th 2013 by Routledge

  9. The Fort Pillow Massacre

    North, South, and the Status of African Americans in the Civil War Era

    By Bruce Tap

    Series: Critical Moments in American History

    On April 12, 1864, a small Union force occupying Fort Pillow, Tennessee, a fortress located on the Mississippi River just north of Memphis, was overwhelmed by a larger Confederate force under the command of Nathan Bedford Forrest. While the battle was insignificant from a strategic standpoint, the...

    Published October 28th 2013 by Routledge

  10. Barack Obama and the Myth of a Post-Racial America

    Edited by Mark Ledwidge, Kevern Verney, Inderjeet Parmar

    Series: Routledge Series on Identity Politics

    The 2008 presidential election was celebrated around the world as a seminal moment in U.S. political and racial history. White liberals and other progressives framed the election through the prism of change, while previously acknowledged demographic changes were hastily heralded as the dawn of a "...

    Published October 18th 2013 by Routledge