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Legal History Books

You are currently browsing 11–20 of 39 new and published books in the subject of Legal History — sorted by publish date from newer books to older books.

For books that are not yet published; please browse forthcoming books.

New and Published Books – Page 2

  1. Bastard Feudalism and the Law (Routledge Revivals)

    By John Bellamy

    Series: Routledge Revivals

    This title, first published in 1989, was one of the first to directly address the legal dimension of bastard feudalism. John Bellamy explores the role and vulnerability of local officials and juries, the nature of the endemic land wars and the interference in the justice system by those at the top...

    Published June 5th 2013 by Routledge

  2. Thurgood Marshall

    Race, Rights, and the Struggle for a More Perfect Union

    By Charles L. Zelden

    Series: Routledge Historical Americans

    Thurgood Marshall was an Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court from 1967 to 1991. He was the first African American to hold that position, and was one of the most influential legal actors of his time. Before being appointed to the Supreme Court by President Lyndon Johnson, Marshall was a lawyer...

    Published May 8th 2013 by Routledge

  3. The ICJ and the Evolution of International Law

    The Enduring Impact of the Corfu Channel Case

    Edited by Karine Bannelier, Théodore Christakis, Sarah Heathcote

    Series: Routledge Research in International Law

    In 1949 the International Court of Justice (ICJ) handed down its first judgment in the Corfu Channel Case. In diffusing an early Cold War dispute, the Court articulated a set of legal principles which continue to shape our appreciation of the international legal order. Many of the issues dealt...

    Published April 14th 2013 by Routledge

  4. Divorce in Medieval England

    From One to Two Persons in Law

    By Sara M. Butler

    Series: Routledge Research in Medieval Studies

    Divorce in Medieval England is intended to reorient scholarly perceptions concerning divorce in the medieval period. Divorce, as we think of it today, is usually considered to be a modern invention. This book challenges that viewpoint, documenting the many and varied uses of divorce in the medieval...

    Published March 10th 2013 by Routledge

  5. The Ends of History

    Questioning the Stakes of Historical Reason

    Edited by Amy Swiffen, Joshua Nichols

    Over two decades ago we were confronted by the end of the Soviet Union and collapse of the geo-political divisions that had defined much of the twentieth century. From this particular end, the ‘end of history’was proclaimed. But is it still possible to argue that liberal democracy and free market...

    Published November 22nd 2012 by Routledge

  6. People Without Rights (Routledge Revivals)

    An Interpretation of the Fundamentals of the Law of Slavery in the U.S. South

    By Andrew Fede

    First published in September 1992, the book traces the nature and development of the fundamental legal relationships among slaves, masters, and third parties. It shows how the colonial and antebellum Southern judges and legislators accommodated slavery’s social relationships into the common law,...

    Published November 21st 2012 by Routledge

  7. Banishment in the Later Roman Empire, 284-476 CE

    By Daniel Washburn

    Series: Routledge Studies in Ancient History

    This book offers a reconstruction and interpretation of banishment in the final era of a unified Roman Empire, 284-476 CE. Author Daniel Washburn argues that exile was both a penalty and a symbol. It applied to those who committed a misstep or crossed the wrong person; it also stood as a marker of...

    Published November 12th 2012 by Routledge

  8. The Scene of the Mass Crime

    History, Film, and International Tribunals

    Edited by Christian Delage, Peter Goodrich

    Series: Discourses of Law

    The Scene of the Mass Crime takes up the unwritten history of the peculiar yet highly visible form of war crimes trials. These trials are the first and continuing site of the interface of law, history and film. From Nuremberg to the contemporary trials in Cambodia, film, in particular, has been...

    Published November 11th 2012 by Routledge

  9. The Fragility of Law

    Constitutional Patriotism and the Jews of Belgium, 1940–1945

    By David Fraser

    The Fragility of Law examines the ways in which, during the Second World War, the Belgian government and judicial structure became implicated in the identification, exclusion and killing of its Jewish residents, and in the theft - through Aryanization - of Jewish property. David Fraser...

    Published June 13th 2012 by Routledge-Cavendish

  10. The Rise of Planning in Industrial America, 1865-1914

    By Richard Adelstein

    Series: Routledge Explorations in Economic History

    Central economic planning is often associated with failed state socialism, and modern capitalism celebrated as its antithesis. This book shows that central planning is not always, or even primarily, a state enterprise, and that the giant industrial corporations that dominated the American economy...

    Published March 25th 2012 by Routledge