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Late Antiquity & Byzantium Books

You are currently browsing 11–20 of 30 new and published books in the subject of Late Antiquity & Byzantium — sorted by publish date from newer books to older books.

For books that are not yet published; please browse forthcoming books.

New and Published Books – Page 2

  1. A History of Seafaring in the Classical World (Routledge Revivals)

    By Fik Meijer

    Series: Routledge Revivals

    A History of Seafaring in the Classical World, first published in 1986, presents a complete treatment of all aspects of the maritime history of the Classical world, designed for the use of students as well as scholars. Beginning with Crete and Mycenae in the third millennium BC, the author expounds...

    Published December 4th 2013 by Routledge

  2. Later Roman Britain (Routledge Revivals)

    By Stephen Johnson

    Series: Routledge Revivals

    Later Roman Britain, first published in 1980, charts the end of Roman rule in Britain and gives an overall impression of the beginning of the so-called ‘Dark Ages’ of British history, the transitional period which saw the breakdown of Roman administration and the beginnings of Saxon settlement....

    Published November 18th 2013 by Routledge

  3. Roman Gaul (Routledge Revivals)

    The Three Provinces, 58 BC-AD 260

    By John Drinkwater

    Series: Routledge Revivals

    Roman Gaul, first published in 1983, makes use of a wealth of archaeological discoveries and modern methods of interpretation to give an account of the Roman presence in Gaul, from the time of Caesar’s conquests until the Crisis of the third century. Professor Drinkwater emphasises the changes...

    Published November 18th 2013 by Routledge

  4. Christians and Pagans in Roman Britain (Routledge Revivals)

    By Dorothy Watts

    Series: Routledge Revivals

    In Christians and Pagans in Roman Britain, first published in 1991, Professor Dorothy Watts sets out to distinguish possible Pagan features in Romano-British Christianity in the period leading up to and immediately following the withdrawal of Roman forces in AD 410. Watts argues that British...

    Published November 7th 2013 by Routledge

  5. Pannonia and Upper Moesia (Routledge Revivals)

    A History of the Middle Danube Provinces of the Roman Empire

    By András Mócsy

    Series: Routledge Revivals

    In Pannonia and Upper Moesia, first published 1974, András Mócsy surveys the Middle Danube Provinces from the latest pre-Roman Iron Age up to the beginning of the Great Migrations. His primary concern is to develop a general synthesis of the archaeological and historical researches in the Danube...

    Published November 7th 2013 by Routledge

  6. Banishment in the Later Roman Empire, 284-476 CE

    By Daniel Washburn

    Series: Routledge Studies in Ancient History

    This book offers a reconstruction and interpretation of banishment in the final era of a unified Roman Empire, 284-476 CE. Author Daniel Washburn argues that exile was both a penalty and a symbol. It applied to those who committed a misstep or crossed the wrong person; it also stood as a marker of...

    Published November 13th 2012 by Routledge

  7. Ancient Medicine

    2nd Edition

    By Vivian Nutton

    Series: Sciences of Antiquity Series

    The first edition of Ancient Medicine was the most complete examination of the medicine of the ancient world for a hundred years. The new edition includes the key discoveries made since the first edition, especially from important texts discovered in recent finds of papyri and manuscripts, making...

    Published November 1st 2012 by Routledge

  8. Julian's Gods

    Religion and Philosophy in the Thought and Action of Julian the Apostate

    By Rowland B. E. Smith

    Julian's brief reign (360-363 AD) had a profound impact on his contemporaries, as he worked fervently for a pagan restoration in the Roman Empire, which was rapidly becoming Christian. Julian's Gods focuses on the cultural mentality of `the last pagan Emperor' by examining a wide variety of his own...

    Published September 30th 2012 by Routledge

  9. The Fall of Constantinople to the Ottomans

    Context and Consequences

    By Michael Angold

    Series: Turning Points

    The fall of Constantinople to the Ottomans in 1453 marked the end of a thousand years of the Christian Roman Empire. Thereafter, world civilisation began a process of radical change. The West came to identify itself as Europe; the Russians were set on the path of autocracy; the Ottomans were...

    Published September 28th 2012 by Routledge

  10. The Roman Empire Divided

    400-700 AD, 2nd Edition

    By John Moorhead

    In 400 the mighty Roman Empire was almost as large as it had ever been; within three centuries, advances by Germanic peoples in western Europe, Slavs in eastern Europe and Arabs around the eastern and southern shores of the Mediterranean had brought about the loss of most of its territory. Ranging...

    Published September 24th 2012 by Routledge