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Kant Books

You are currently browsing 11–20 of 37 new and published books in the subject of Kant — sorted by publish date from newer books to older books.

For books that are not yet published; please browse forthcoming books.

New and Published Books – Page 2

  1. Art and Ethics in a Material World

    Kant’s Pragmatist Legacy

    By Jennifer A McMahon

    Series: Routledge Studies in Ethics and Moral Theory

    In this book, McMahon argues that a reading of Kant’s body of work in the light of a pragmatist theory of meaning and language (which arguably is a Kantian legacy) leads one to put community reception ahead of individual reception in the order of aesthetic relations. A core premise of the book is...

    Published August 7th 2013 by Routledge

  2. Reading Onora O’Neill

    Edited by David Archard, Monique Deveaux, Neil Manson, Daniel Weinstock

    Onora O’Neill is one of the foremost moral philosophers writing today. Her work on ethics and bioethics, political philosophy and the philosophy of Kant is extremely influential. Her landmark Reith Lectures on trust did much to establish the subject not only on the philosophical and political...

    Published June 24th 2013 by Routledge

  3. The German Mittelweg

    Garden Theory and Philosophy in the Time of Kant

    By Michael G. Lee

    Series: Studies in Philosophy

    In the 1790s, a close-knit group of German philosophers published several garden theory texts. These works are unique in that a close-knit group of philosophers had never before--and has not since--produced so many works on the topic of garden design. In essence, this cohort sought to imbue...

    Published May 13th 2013 by Routledge

  4. The Hidden God

    A Study of Tragic Vision in the Pense´es of Pascal and the Tragedies of Racine

    By Lucien Goldmann

    Series: Routledge Library Editions: Philosophy of Religion

    The concept of ‘world visions’, first elaborated in the early work of Georg Lukàcs, is used here as a tool whereby the similarities between Pascal’s Pensées and Kant’s critical philosophy are contrasted with the rationalism of Descartes and the empiricism of Hume. For Lucien Goldmann, a leading...

    Published April 10th 2013 by Routledge

  5. What is Enlightenment?

    By Samuel Fleischacker

    Series: Kant's Questions

    "Have the courage to use your own understanding! - that is the motto of enlightenment." - Immanuel Kant The Enlightenment is one of the most important and contested periods in the history of philosophy. The problems it addressed, such as the proper extent of individual freedom and the challenging...

    Published February 20th 2013 by Routledge

  6. What is the Human Being?

    By Patrick R. Frierson

    Series: Kant's Questions

    Philosophers, anthropologists and biologists have long puzzled over the question of human nature. It is also a question that Kant thought about deeply and returned to in many of his writings. In this lucid and wide-ranging introduction to Kant’s philosophy of human nature - which is essential for...

    Published February 11th 2013 by Routledge

  7. Kant and Non-Conceptual Content

    Edited by Dietmar H. Heidemann

    Conceptualism is the view that cognizers can have mental representations of the world only if they possess the adequate concepts by means of which they can specify what they represent. By contrast, non-conceptualism is the view that mental representations of the world do not necessarily presuppose...

    Published December 4th 2012 by Routledge

  8. Disjunctivism

    Disjunctive Accounts in Epistemology and in the Philosophy of Perception

    Edited by Marcus Willaschek

    Does perception provide us with direct and unmediated access to the world around us? The so-called 'argument from illusion ' has traditionally been supposed to show otherwise: from the subject's point of view, perceptual illusions are often indistinguishable from veridical perceptions; hence,...

    Published September 17th 2012 by Routledge

  9. Kant’s Theory of the Self

    By Arthur Melnick

    Series: Routledge Studies in Eighteenth-Century Philosophy

    The self for Kant is something real, and yet is neither appearance nor thing in itself, but rather has some third status. Appearances for Kant arise in space and time where these are respectively forms of outer and inner attending (intuition). Melnick explains the "third status" by identifying...

    Published November 2nd 2010 by Routledge

  10. Continental Idealism

    Leibniz to Nietzsche

    By Paul Redding

    Standard accounts of nineteenth-century German philosophy often begin with Kant and assess philosophers after him in light of their responses to Kantian idealism. In Continental Idealism, Paul Redding argues that the story of German idealism begins with Leibniz. Redding begins by examining...

    Published April 29th 2009 by Routledge